UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Everolimus in different combinations as maintenance immunosuppressive therapy in heart transplant recipients


Schweiger, Martin; Stiegler, Philipp; Puntschart, Andreas; Sereinigg, Michael; Prenner, Guenther; Wasler, Andre; Tscheliessnigg, Karlheinz (2012). Everolimus in different combinations as maintenance immunosuppressive therapy in heart transplant recipients. Experimental and Clinical Transplantation, 10(3):273-277.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined the experiences of heart transplant recipients receiving everolimus as maintenance therapy in different combinations over a long time.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 2004 and 2009, forty patients (29 men, 11 women; mean age, 51.6 y) were switched from a routine immunosuppressive regimen to everolimus. Indications were other (2), renal insufficiency (17), cardiac allograft vasculopathy (14), and ongoing cellular rejection (7). Combinations were either along with cyclosporine (24), mycophenolate mofetil (14), or others (2). Indications for the introduction of everolimus including safety, efficacy, different combinations of everolimus, biopsy-proven acute rejections, renal function, and infections were evaluated retrospectively.
RESULTS: Five patients died, 4 of them were still on everolimus at the time of death; they died from intracerebral hemorrhage (1), embolism (1), cardiac arrest (2), and unknown (1). Everolimus was discontinued in 6 patients owing to severe adverse effects: Edema (2), gastrointestinal adverse effects (3), and dermal adverse effects (1). Mean everolimus trough levels were 5.8 μmol/L at 6 months and 4.9 at 60 months. Mean cyclosporine levels were 67.62 μmol/L at 6 months and 47.3 μmol/L at 60 months. Mean serum creatinine levels were stable (147.9 μmol/L after 60 months). Four life-threatening infections (all pneumonia) occurred but resulted in complete recovery.
CONCLUSIONS: Everolimus is safe with different immunosuppressive combinations after receiving a heart transplant.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined the experiences of heart transplant recipients receiving everolimus as maintenance therapy in different combinations over a long time.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 2004 and 2009, forty patients (29 men, 11 women; mean age, 51.6 y) were switched from a routine immunosuppressive regimen to everolimus. Indications were other (2), renal insufficiency (17), cardiac allograft vasculopathy (14), and ongoing cellular rejection (7). Combinations were either along with cyclosporine (24), mycophenolate mofetil (14), or others (2). Indications for the introduction of everolimus including safety, efficacy, different combinations of everolimus, biopsy-proven acute rejections, renal function, and infections were evaluated retrospectively.
RESULTS: Five patients died, 4 of them were still on everolimus at the time of death; they died from intracerebral hemorrhage (1), embolism (1), cardiac arrest (2), and unknown (1). Everolimus was discontinued in 6 patients owing to severe adverse effects: Edema (2), gastrointestinal adverse effects (3), and dermal adverse effects (1). Mean everolimus trough levels were 5.8 μmol/L at 6 months and 4.9 at 60 months. Mean cyclosporine levels were 67.62 μmol/L at 6 months and 47.3 μmol/L at 60 months. Mean serum creatinine levels were stable (147.9 μmol/L after 60 months). Four life-threatening infections (all pneumonia) occurred but resulted in complete recovery.
CONCLUSIONS: Everolimus is safe with different immunosuppressive combinations after receiving a heart transplant.

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:01 Mar 2013 20:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:35
Publisher:Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation
ISSN:1304-0855
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.6002/ect.2011.0156
PubMed ID:22631065

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations