UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Starvation-induced activation of ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin


Shi, Yandong; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Marti, Thomas M; Orlowski, Katrin; Pruschy, Martin; Stahel, Rolf A (2012). Starvation-induced activation of ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin. BMC Cancer, 12:571.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Optimizing the safety and efficacy of standard chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin (CDDP) is of clinical relevance. Serum starvation in vitro and short-term food starvation in vivo both stress cells by the sudden depletion of paracrine growth stimulation. METHODS: The effects of serum starvation on CDDP toxicity were investigated in normal and cancer cells by assessing proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of DNA-damage response and of AMPK, and were compared to effects observed in cells grown in serum-containing medium. The effects of short-term food starvation on CDDP chemotherapy were assessed in xenografts-bearing mice and were compared to effects on tumor growth and/or regression determined in mice with no diet alteration. RESULTS: We observed that serum starvation in vitro sensitizes cancer cells to CDDP while protecting normal cells. In detail, in normal cells, serum starvation resulted in a complete arrest of cellular proliferation, i.e. depletion of BrdU-incorporation during S-phase and accumulation of the cells in the G0/G1-phase of the cell cycle. Further analysis revealed that proliferation arrest in normal cells is due to p53/p21 activation, which is AMPK-dependent and ATM-independent. In cancer cells, serum starvation also decreased the fraction of S-phase cells but to a minor extent. In contrast to normal cells, serum starvation-induced p53 activation in cancer cells is both AMPK- and ATM-dependent. Combination of CDDP with serum starvation in vitro increased the activation of ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling pathway compared to either treatment alone resulting in an enhanced sensitization of cancer cells to CDDP. Finally, short-term food starvation dramatically increased the sensitivity of human tumor xenografts to cisplatin as indicated not only by a significant growth delay, but also by the induction of complete remission in 60% of the animals bearing mesothelioma xenografts, and in 40% of the animals with lung carcinoma xenografts. CONCLUSION: In normal cells, serum starvation in vitro induces a cell cycle arrest and protects from CDDP induced toxicity. In contrast, proliferation of cancer cells is only moderately reduced by serum starvation whereas CDDP toxicity is enhanced. The combination of CDDP treatment with short term food starvation improved outcome in vivo. Therefore, starvation has the potential to enhance the therapeutic index of cisplatin-based therapy.

BACKGROUND: Optimizing the safety and efficacy of standard chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin (CDDP) is of clinical relevance. Serum starvation in vitro and short-term food starvation in vivo both stress cells by the sudden depletion of paracrine growth stimulation. METHODS: The effects of serum starvation on CDDP toxicity were investigated in normal and cancer cells by assessing proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of DNA-damage response and of AMPK, and were compared to effects observed in cells grown in serum-containing medium. The effects of short-term food starvation on CDDP chemotherapy were assessed in xenografts-bearing mice and were compared to effects on tumor growth and/or regression determined in mice with no diet alteration. RESULTS: We observed that serum starvation in vitro sensitizes cancer cells to CDDP while protecting normal cells. In detail, in normal cells, serum starvation resulted in a complete arrest of cellular proliferation, i.e. depletion of BrdU-incorporation during S-phase and accumulation of the cells in the G0/G1-phase of the cell cycle. Further analysis revealed that proliferation arrest in normal cells is due to p53/p21 activation, which is AMPK-dependent and ATM-independent. In cancer cells, serum starvation also decreased the fraction of S-phase cells but to a minor extent. In contrast to normal cells, serum starvation-induced p53 activation in cancer cells is both AMPK- and ATM-dependent. Combination of CDDP with serum starvation in vitro increased the activation of ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling pathway compared to either treatment alone resulting in an enhanced sensitization of cancer cells to CDDP. Finally, short-term food starvation dramatically increased the sensitivity of human tumor xenografts to cisplatin as indicated not only by a significant growth delay, but also by the induction of complete remission in 60% of the animals bearing mesothelioma xenografts, and in 40% of the animals with lung carcinoma xenografts. CONCLUSION: In normal cells, serum starvation in vitro induces a cell cycle arrest and protects from CDDP induced toxicity. In contrast, proliferation of cancer cells is only moderately reduced by serum starvation whereas CDDP toxicity is enhanced. The combination of CDDP treatment with short term food starvation improved outcome in vivo. Therefore, starvation has the potential to enhance the therapeutic index of cisplatin-based therapy.

Citations

25 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

49 downloads since deposited on 28 Feb 2013
17 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Radiation Oncology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Oncology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:28 Feb 2013 15:41
Last Modified:21 Nov 2016 14:31
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2407
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-12-571
PubMed ID:23211021
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-74919

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations