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Association of genetic variation in the NR1H4 gene, encoding the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR, with inflammatory bowel disease


Attinkara, Ragam; Mwinyi, Jessica; Truninger, Kaspar; Regula, Jaroslaw; Gaj, Pawel; Rogler, Gerhard; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Eloranta, Jyrki J (2012). Association of genetic variation in the NR1H4 gene, encoding the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR, with inflammatory bowel disease. BMC Research Notes, 5:461.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), involves interaction between environmental factors and inappropriate immune responses in the intestine of genetically predisposed individuals. Bile acids and their nuclear receptor, FXR, regulate inflammatory responses and barrier function in the intestinal tract. METHODS: We studied the association of five variants (rs3863377, rs7138843, rs56163822, rs35724, rs10860603) of the NR1H4 gene encoding FXR with IBD. 1138 individuals (591 non-IBD, 203 UC, 344 CD) were genotyped for five NR1H4 genetic variants with TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. RESULTS: We observed that the NR1H4 SNP rs3863377 is significantly less frequent in IBD cases than in non-IBD controls (allele frequencies: P = 0.004; wild-type vs. SNP carrier genotype frequencies: P = 0.008), whereas the variant rs56163822 is less prevalent in non-IBD controls (allele frequencies: P = 0.027; wild-type vs. SNP carrier genotype frequencies: P = 0.035). The global haplotype distribution between IBD and control patients was significantly different (P = 0.003). This also held true for the comparison between non-IBD and UC groups (P = 0.004), but not for the comparison between non-IBD and CD groups (P = 0.079). CONCLUSIONS: We show that genetic variation in FXR is associated with IBD, further emphasizing the link between bile acid signaling and intestinal inflammation.

BACKGROUND: Pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), involves interaction between environmental factors and inappropriate immune responses in the intestine of genetically predisposed individuals. Bile acids and their nuclear receptor, FXR, regulate inflammatory responses and barrier function in the intestinal tract. METHODS: We studied the association of five variants (rs3863377, rs7138843, rs56163822, rs35724, rs10860603) of the NR1H4 gene encoding FXR with IBD. 1138 individuals (591 non-IBD, 203 UC, 344 CD) were genotyped for five NR1H4 genetic variants with TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. RESULTS: We observed that the NR1H4 SNP rs3863377 is significantly less frequent in IBD cases than in non-IBD controls (allele frequencies: P = 0.004; wild-type vs. SNP carrier genotype frequencies: P = 0.008), whereas the variant rs56163822 is less prevalent in non-IBD controls (allele frequencies: P = 0.027; wild-type vs. SNP carrier genotype frequencies: P = 0.035). The global haplotype distribution between IBD and control patients was significantly different (P = 0.003). This also held true for the comparison between non-IBD and UC groups (P = 0.004), but not for the comparison between non-IBD and CD groups (P = 0.079). CONCLUSIONS: We show that genetic variation in FXR is associated with IBD, further emphasizing the link between bile acid signaling and intestinal inflammation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:07 Mar 2013 10:10
Last Modified:17 Nov 2016 13:54
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1756-0500
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/1756-0500-5-461
PubMed ID:22929053
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-75415

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