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The effect of short- and long-term treatment with manuka honey on second intention healing of contaminated and noncontaminated wounds on the distal aspect of the forelimbs in horses


Bischofberger, Andrea S; Dart, Christina M; Perkins, Nigel R; Kelly, Ashley; Jeffcott, Leo; Dart, Andrew J (2012). The effect of short- and long-term treatment with manuka honey on second intention healing of contaminated and noncontaminated wounds on the distal aspect of the forelimbs in horses. Veterinary Surgery, 42(2):154-160.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of manuka honey and manuka honey gel on second intention healing of noncontaminated distal limb wounds and those contaminated with feces.
STUDY DESIGN: Experimental study.
ANIMALS: Standardbred horses (n = 10).
METHODS: Five full-thickness wounds (2 × 2 cm) were created on both metacarpi. Wounds on 1 forelimb were covered with horse feces for 24 hours. Wounds on the contralateral limb were left uncontaminated. Wounds were assigned to the following 5 different treatments: manuka honey, manuka honey gel or gel applied for 12 days, manuka honey gel applied throughout healing and untreated control. Wound area was measured on day 1 then weekly until day 42 and time to complete healing was recorded.
RESULTS: Wounds treated with manuka honey gel throughout healing healed faster than all other wounds (P < .05). Wounds treated with manuka honey and manuka honey gel for 12 days healed faster than gel control and untreated control wounds (P < .05). Wounds treated with manuka honey and manuka honey gel for 12 days and throughout healing were smaller than gel control and untreated control wounds until day 35 (P < .05). Wounds contaminated with feces had greater retraction for 7 days, but healed faster than noncontaminated wounds (P < .05).
CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of wounds with manuka honey and manuka honey gel reduced wound retraction and overall healing time compared with gel and untreated control wounds.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of manuka honey and manuka honey gel on second intention healing of noncontaminated distal limb wounds and those contaminated with feces.
STUDY DESIGN: Experimental study.
ANIMALS: Standardbred horses (n = 10).
METHODS: Five full-thickness wounds (2 × 2 cm) were created on both metacarpi. Wounds on 1 forelimb were covered with horse feces for 24 hours. Wounds on the contralateral limb were left uncontaminated. Wounds were assigned to the following 5 different treatments: manuka honey, manuka honey gel or gel applied for 12 days, manuka honey gel applied throughout healing and untreated control. Wound area was measured on day 1 then weekly until day 42 and time to complete healing was recorded.
RESULTS: Wounds treated with manuka honey gel throughout healing healed faster than all other wounds (P < .05). Wounds treated with manuka honey and manuka honey gel for 12 days healed faster than gel control and untreated control wounds (P < .05). Wounds treated with manuka honey and manuka honey gel for 12 days and throughout healing were smaller than gel control and untreated control wounds until day 35 (P < .05). Wounds contaminated with feces had greater retraction for 7 days, but healed faster than noncontaminated wounds (P < .05).
CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of wounds with manuka honey and manuka honey gel reduced wound retraction and overall healing time compared with gel and untreated control wounds.

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14 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:26 Feb 2013 17:10
Last Modified:19 May 2016 07:07
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0161-3499
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-950X.2012.01083.x
PubMed ID:23216146

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