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Granulomatous keratic precipitates in birdshot retinochoroiditis


Knecht, P B; Papadia, M; Herbort, C P (2013). Granulomatous keratic precipitates in birdshot retinochoroiditis. International Ophthalmology, 33(2):133-137.

Abstract

With the purpose of facilitating clinical studies of this infrequent disease, an expert panel published research criteria for birdshot retinochoroiditis (RCBRC). The aim of our study was to investigate the sensitivity of the exclusion criteria of the RCBRC as applied to all patients seen in our center with a diagnosis of BRC. This was a single center retrospective study involving all patients with an ocular inflammatory disease seen at the Centre for Ophthalmic Specialized Care, Lausanne, Switzerland, between 1995 and 2012. The percentage of patients with a diagnosis of BRC was identified. The exclusion criteria of the RCBRC were applied to all patients and the percentage of patients with absence of keratic precipitates (KPs) and absence of posterior synechiae were calculated. Out of 1,504 new patients, 25 patients (1.66 %; 19 female, 6 male) were diagnosed with BRC and 19 patients had sufficient data to be included in the study (1.26 %, 13 female). All patients were positive for HLA-A29 testing. The sensitivity of the RCBRC with respect to the exclusion criteria applied to our patient cohort was 84.2 % due to the exclusion of three patients showing KPs. Our study supports the motion to re-evaluate the RCBRC, since granulomatous KPs can be present and are more frequent than previously estimated and stringent application of the criteria would lead to a substantial loss of study patients.

Abstract

With the purpose of facilitating clinical studies of this infrequent disease, an expert panel published research criteria for birdshot retinochoroiditis (RCBRC). The aim of our study was to investigate the sensitivity of the exclusion criteria of the RCBRC as applied to all patients seen in our center with a diagnosis of BRC. This was a single center retrospective study involving all patients with an ocular inflammatory disease seen at the Centre for Ophthalmic Specialized Care, Lausanne, Switzerland, between 1995 and 2012. The percentage of patients with a diagnosis of BRC was identified. The exclusion criteria of the RCBRC were applied to all patients and the percentage of patients with absence of keratic precipitates (KPs) and absence of posterior synechiae were calculated. Out of 1,504 new patients, 25 patients (1.66 %; 19 female, 6 male) were diagnosed with BRC and 19 patients had sufficient data to be included in the study (1.26 %, 13 female). All patients were positive for HLA-A29 testing. The sensitivity of the RCBRC with respect to the exclusion criteria applied to our patient cohort was 84.2 % due to the exclusion of three patients showing KPs. Our study supports the motion to re-evaluate the RCBRC, since granulomatous KPs can be present and are more frequent than previously estimated and stringent application of the criteria would lead to a substantial loss of study patients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Mar 2013 09:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:39
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0165-5701
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10792-012-9650-1
PubMed ID:23080031

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