UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Maternal modulation of natal dispersal in a passerine bird: an adaptive strategy to cope with parasitism?


Tschirren, Barbara; Fitze, Patrick; Richner, Heinz (2007). Maternal modulation of natal dispersal in a passerine bird: an adaptive strategy to cope with parasitism? The American Naturalist, 169(1):87-93.

Abstract

The decision of how far to disperse from the natal ter- ritory has profound and long-lasting consequences for young ani- mals, yet the optimal dispersal behavior often depends on environ- mental factors that are difficult or impossible to assess by inexperienced juveniles. Natural selection thus favors mechanisms that allow the adaptive and flexible adjustment of the offspring’s dispersal behavior by their parents via either paternal or maternal effects. Here we show that different dispersal strategies maximize the reproductive success of young great tits (Parus major) originating from a parasite-infested or a parasite-free nest and demonstrate that differential transfer of maternal yolk androgens in response to par- asitism can result in a modification of the offspring’s dispersal be- havior that appears adaptive. It demonstrates that prenatal maternal effects are an important yet so far neglected determinant of natal dispersal and highlights the potential importance of maternal effects in mediating coevolutionary processes in host-parasite systems.

Abstract

The decision of how far to disperse from the natal ter- ritory has profound and long-lasting consequences for young ani- mals, yet the optimal dispersal behavior often depends on environ- mental factors that are difficult or impossible to assess by inexperienced juveniles. Natural selection thus favors mechanisms that allow the adaptive and flexible adjustment of the offspring’s dispersal behavior by their parents via either paternal or maternal effects. Here we show that different dispersal strategies maximize the reproductive success of young great tits (Parus major) originating from a parasite-infested or a parasite-free nest and demonstrate that differential transfer of maternal yolk androgens in response to par- asitism can result in a modification of the offspring’s dispersal be- havior that appears adaptive. It demonstrates that prenatal maternal effects are an important yet so far neglected determinant of natal dispersal and highlights the potential importance of maternal effects in mediating coevolutionary processes in host-parasite systems.

Citations

62 citations in Web of Science®
61 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

77 downloads since deposited on 28 Mar 2013
11 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:28 Mar 2013 15:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:39
Publisher:University of Chicago Press
ISSN:0003-0147
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/509945
PubMed ID:17206587

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 191kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations