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Regulation of the DNA replication fork: a way to fight genomic instability.


Toueille, M; Hübscher, U (2004). Regulation of the DNA replication fork: a way to fight genomic instability. Chromosoma, 113(3):113-125.

Abstract

DNA replication is a complex mechanism that functions due to the coordinated interplay of many factors. In the last few years, numerous studies have suggested that DNA replication factors are closely implicated in several DNA transaction events that maintain the integrity of the genome. Therefore, DNA replication fork factors have to be considered as part of a general process that aims to protect and replicate the genome in order to allow correct functioning of a cell and its eventual daughter cells. This is illustrated by the numerous factors that have a well-defined function at the DNA replication fork, but also play crucial roles in different DNA repair pathways such as base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, double-strand break repair, and mismatch repair. Moreover, several of the replisome proteins have also been shown to be essential in sensing and transducing DNA damages through the checkpoint cascade pathways, including the recently characterised alternative clamps and clamp-loaders. In this review we present DNA replication factors that are involved in different DNA transaction and checkpoint regulation pathways, with emphasis on the link between DNA replication and maintenance of genomic stability.

DNA replication is a complex mechanism that functions due to the coordinated interplay of many factors. In the last few years, numerous studies have suggested that DNA replication factors are closely implicated in several DNA transaction events that maintain the integrity of the genome. Therefore, DNA replication fork factors have to be considered as part of a general process that aims to protect and replicate the genome in order to allow correct functioning of a cell and its eventual daughter cells. This is illustrated by the numerous factors that have a well-defined function at the DNA replication fork, but also play crucial roles in different DNA repair pathways such as base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, double-strand break repair, and mismatch repair. Moreover, several of the replisome proteins have also been shown to be essential in sensing and transducing DNA damages through the checkpoint cascade pathways, including the recently characterised alternative clamps and clamp-loaders. In this review we present DNA replication factors that are involved in different DNA transaction and checkpoint regulation pathways, with emphasis on the link between DNA replication and maintenance of genomic stability.

Citations

18 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:1 September 2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0009-5915
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00412-004-0303-7
PubMed ID:15300444

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