UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Physical impacts of climate change on landslide occurrence and related adaptation


Huggel, Christian; Khabarov, Nikolay; Korup, Oliver; Obersteiner, Michael (2012). Physical impacts of climate change on landslide occurrence and related adaptation. In: Clague, John J; Stead, Douglas. Landslides: Types, Mechanisms and Modeling. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 121-133.

Abstract

We review current understanding of the effects of climate change on the occurrence of landslides and debris flows in cold, temperate, and tropical mountains. We start with a summary of observed impacts of climate change on shallow landslides and debris flows, followed by discussions of rock-slope failures and the physical processes that make climate an important cause and trigger of landslides. While an increase in extreme precipitation has been observed in many regions worldwide over the past decades, changes in frequency and magnitude of landslides are more difficult to identify. In high mountain regions with snow, glaciers, and permafrost, slope stability is sensitive not only to changes in precipitation but also to changes in temperature. In the European Alps, the number of high alpine rock-slope failures has increased over the past few decades, coincident with an increase in mean air temperature. Model-based projections of future climate indicate that extreme precipitation events are likely to increase, causing more landslides. Seasonal variations in precipitation and earlier snowmelt imply changes in the seasonality of landslide occurrence. In addition, changes in sediment supply can strongly condition debris-flow frequency and magnitude. We conclude with a case study that outlines the potential and limitations of adaptation to future changes in precipitation.

We review current understanding of the effects of climate change on the occurrence of landslides and debris flows in cold, temperate, and tropical mountains. We start with a summary of observed impacts of climate change on shallow landslides and debris flows, followed by discussions of rock-slope failures and the physical processes that make climate an important cause and trigger of landslides. While an increase in extreme precipitation has been observed in many regions worldwide over the past decades, changes in frequency and magnitude of landslides are more difficult to identify. In high mountain regions with snow, glaciers, and permafrost, slope stability is sensitive not only to changes in precipitation but also to changes in temperature. In the European Alps, the number of high alpine rock-slope failures has increased over the past few decades, coincident with an increase in mean air temperature. Model-based projections of future climate indicate that extreme precipitation events are likely to increase, causing more landslides. Seasonal variations in precipitation and earlier snowmelt imply changes in the seasonality of landslide occurrence. In addition, changes in sediment supply can strongly condition debris-flow frequency and magnitude. We conclude with a case study that outlines the potential and limitations of adaptation to future changes in precipitation.

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 12 Mar 2013
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Mar 2013 13:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:41
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISBN:978-1-107-00206-7
Related URLs:http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item6680995/?site_locale=en_GB (Publisher)
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-76513

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 2MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations