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Combining hyperspectral remote sensing and physical modeling for applications in land ecosystems - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Goodenough, David; Li, Jing Y; Asner, Gregory P; Schaepman, Michael E; Ustin, Susan L; Dyk, Andrew (2006). Combining hyperspectral remote sensing and physical modeling for applications in land ecosystems. In: 2006 Ieee International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Denver, Colorado, 31 July 2006 - 4 August 2006, 2000-2004.

Abstract

Land ecosystems, in particular forest ecosystems, are under increasing pressure from environmental changes such as population growth, global warming, wildfires, forest insects, and diseases. Data from hyperspectral sensors can be used to map forest species and determine biophysical and biochemical properties. Modeling plays an important role in accurate determination of ecosystem properties. Radiative transfer models are used to understand how radiation interacts with the atmosphere and the Earth’s terrestrial surface and to correct observed radiances to surface reflectance. Canopy models are used to infer through inversion quantitative information from hyperspectral data on canopy structure and foliage biochemistry. This article presents an overview on combining hyperspectral sensing with canopy radiative transfer models to derive ecosystem information products.

Abstract

Land ecosystems, in particular forest ecosystems, are under increasing pressure from environmental changes such as population growth, global warming, wildfires, forest insects, and diseases. Data from hyperspectral sensors can be used to map forest species and determine biophysical and biochemical properties. Modeling plays an important role in accurate determination of ecosystem properties. Radiative transfer models are used to understand how radiation interacts with the atmosphere and the Earth’s terrestrial surface and to correct observed radiances to surface reflectance. Canopy models are used to infer through inversion quantitative information from hyperspectral data on canopy structure and foliage biochemistry. This article presents an overview on combining hyperspectral sensing with canopy radiative transfer models to derive ecosystem information products.

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:4 August 2006
Deposited On:14 Mar 2013 09:50
Last Modified:16 Apr 2017 07:43
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/IGARSS.2006.518

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