UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The solution structure of functionally active human proliferating cell nuclear antigen determined by small-angle neutron scattering.


Schurtenberger, P; Egelhaaf, S U; Hindges, R; Maga, G; Jónsson, Z O; May, R P; Glatter, O; Hübscher, U (1998). The solution structure of functionally active human proliferating cell nuclear antigen determined by small-angle neutron scattering. Journal of Molecular Biology, 275(1):123-132.

Abstract

The function of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in DNA replication and repair is to form a sliding clamp with replication factor C (RF-C) tethering DNA polymerase delta or epsilon to DNA. In addition, PCNA has been found to interact directly with various proteins involved in cell cycle regulation. The crystal structure of yeast PCNA shows that the protein forms a homotrimeric ring lining a hole through which double-stranded DNA can thread, thus forming a moving platform for DNA synthesis. Human and yeast PCNA are highly conserved at a structural and functional level. We determined the solution structure of functionally active human PCNA by small-angle neutron scattering. Our measurements strongly support a trimeric ring-like structure of functionally active PCNA in solution, and the data are in good agreement with model calculations based on the crystal structure from yeast PCNA. The human PCNA used in the small-angle neutron scattering experiments was active before and after the measurements in a RF-C independent and a RF-C dependent assay suggesting that the trimeric structure is the in vivo functional form.

Abstract

The function of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in DNA replication and repair is to form a sliding clamp with replication factor C (RF-C) tethering DNA polymerase delta or epsilon to DNA. In addition, PCNA has been found to interact directly with various proteins involved in cell cycle regulation. The crystal structure of yeast PCNA shows that the protein forms a homotrimeric ring lining a hole through which double-stranded DNA can thread, thus forming a moving platform for DNA synthesis. Human and yeast PCNA are highly conserved at a structural and functional level. We determined the solution structure of functionally active human PCNA by small-angle neutron scattering. Our measurements strongly support a trimeric ring-like structure of functionally active PCNA in solution, and the data are in good agreement with model calculations based on the crystal structure from yeast PCNA. The human PCNA used in the small-angle neutron scattering experiments was active before and after the measurements in a RF-C independent and a RF-C dependent assay suggesting that the trimeric structure is the in vivo functional form.

Citations

52 citations in Web of Science®
50 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:9 January 1998
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-2836
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1006/jmbi.1997.1435
PubMed ID:9451444

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations