UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Comparative analysis of biological models used in the Study of Pollen Tube Growth


Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Inatsugi, Rie (2006). Comparative analysis of biological models used in the Study of Pollen Tube Growth. In: Malho, Rui. The Pollen Tube. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer, 265-286.

Abstract

The mechanisms of pollen tube growth have been studied in a wide variety of plant species. Since the 1990s, with the explosion of molecular genetic analyses in Arabidopsis thaliana, most studies started to focus on this model plant. However, because of their particular characteristics, plant species other than Arabidopsis are still used to reveal physiological mechanisms and identify novel molecules relating to pollen tube growth, including, for example, lily, tobacco, Nicotiana alata, tomato, rice, maize, Brassica spp., corn poppy and Torenia (Table 1). Here, we designate all of these relatively common experimental plants as “biological models” for the study of pollen tube growth. These models sometimes provide a good first step in the identification of novel physiological mechanisms and molecules. As genome sequencing technologies become more advanced, the difficulty of performing molecular analyses in these biological models will decrease. Thus, a better understanding of these biological models will allow researchers to perform unique studies of pollen tube growth. In this chapter, we compare the characteristics of biological models, focusing on in vitro systems, to facilitate the use of these biological models for in vitro analyses.

The mechanisms of pollen tube growth have been studied in a wide variety of plant species. Since the 1990s, with the explosion of molecular genetic analyses in Arabidopsis thaliana, most studies started to focus on this model plant. However, because of their particular characteristics, plant species other than Arabidopsis are still used to reveal physiological mechanisms and identify novel molecules relating to pollen tube growth, including, for example, lily, tobacco, Nicotiana alata, tomato, rice, maize, Brassica spp., corn poppy and Torenia (Table 1). Here, we designate all of these relatively common experimental plants as “biological models” for the study of pollen tube growth. These models sometimes provide a good first step in the identification of novel physiological mechanisms and molecules. As genome sequencing technologies become more advanced, the difficulty of performing molecular analyses in these biological models will decrease. Thus, a better understanding of these biological models will allow researchers to perform unique studies of pollen tube growth. In this chapter, we compare the characteristics of biological models, focusing on in vitro systems, to facilitate the use of these biological models for in vitro analyses.

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:23 Apr 2013 06:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:45
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Plant Cell Monographs
Number:3
ISSN:1861-1370
ISBN:978-3-540-34276-2
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/7089_053
Related URLs:http://kaken.nii.ac.jp/d/p/17027006/2006/3/ja.en.html

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations