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An approach to evaluating motion pattern detection techniques in spatio-temporal data


Laube, Patrick; Purves, Ross S (2006). An approach to evaluating motion pattern detection techniques in spatio-temporal data. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, 30(3):347-374.

Abstract

This paper presents a method to evaluate a geographic knowledge discovery approach for explor- ing the motion of point objects. The goal is to provide a means of considering the signiWcance of motion patterns, described through their interestingness. We use Monte-Carlo simulations of con- strained random walks to generate populations of synthetic lifelines, using the statistical properties of real observational data as constraints. Pattern occurrence in the synthetic data is then compared with observational data to assess the potential interestingness of the found patterns. We use motion data from wildlife biology and spatialisation in political science for the evaluation. The results of the numerical experiments show that the interestingness of found motion patterns is largely dependant on the conWguration of the pattern matching process, which includes the pattern extent, the temporal granularity, and the classiWcation schema used for the motion attributes azimuth and speed. The results of the numerical experiments allow interestingness to be attached only to some of the patterns found—other patterns were suggested to be not interesting. The evaluation method helps in estimat- ing useful conWgurations of the pattern detection process. This work emphasises the need to further investigate the statistical aspects of the problem under study in (geographic) knowledge discovery.

Abstract

This paper presents a method to evaluate a geographic knowledge discovery approach for explor- ing the motion of point objects. The goal is to provide a means of considering the signiWcance of motion patterns, described through their interestingness. We use Monte-Carlo simulations of con- strained random walks to generate populations of synthetic lifelines, using the statistical properties of real observational data as constraints. Pattern occurrence in the synthetic data is then compared with observational data to assess the potential interestingness of the found patterns. We use motion data from wildlife biology and spatialisation in political science for the evaluation. The results of the numerical experiments show that the interestingness of found motion patterns is largely dependant on the conWguration of the pattern matching process, which includes the pattern extent, the temporal granularity, and the classiWcation schema used for the motion attributes azimuth and speed. The results of the numerical experiments allow interestingness to be attached only to some of the patterns found—other patterns were suggested to be not interesting. The evaluation method helps in estimat- ing useful conWgurations of the pattern detection process. This work emphasises the need to further investigate the statistical aspects of the problem under study in (geographic) knowledge discovery.

Citations

21 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:24 Apr 2013 10:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:45
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0198-9715
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compenvurbsys.2005.09.001

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