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A theoretical grounding for semantic descriptions of place


Edwardes, Alistair; Purves, Ross S (2007). A theoretical grounding for semantic descriptions of place. In: Ware, J Mark; Taylor, George E. Web and Wireless Geographical Information Systems 7th International Symposium, W2GIS 2007, Cardiff, UK, November 28-29, 2007. Proceedings. Berlin: Springer, 106-120.

Abstract

This paper is motivated by the problem of how to provide better access to ever enlarging collections of digital images. The paper opens by examining the concept of place in geographic theory and suggests how it might provide a way of providing keywords suitable for indexing of images. The paper then focuses on the specific challenge of how places are described in natural language, drawing on previous research from the literature that has looked at eliciting geographical concepts related to so-called basic levels. The authors describe their own approach to eliciting such terms. This employs techniques to mine a database of descriptions of images that document the geography of the United Kingdom and compares the results with those found in the literature. The most four most frequent basic levels encountered in the database, based on fifty possible terms derived from the literature, were road, hill, river and village. In co-occurrence experiments terms describing the elements and qualities of basic levels showed a qualitative accordance with expectations for example, terms describing element of beaches included shingle and sand and, those for beach qualities included being soft and deserted.

This paper is motivated by the problem of how to provide better access to ever enlarging collections of digital images. The paper opens by examining the concept of place in geographic theory and suggests how it might provide a way of providing keywords suitable for indexing of images. The paper then focuses on the specific challenge of how places are described in natural language, drawing on previous research from the literature that has looked at eliciting geographical concepts related to so-called basic levels. The authors describe their own approach to eliciting such terms. This employs techniques to mine a database of descriptions of images that document the geography of the United Kingdom and compares the results with those found in the literature. The most four most frequent basic levels encountered in the database, based on fifty possible terms derived from the literature, were road, hill, river and village. In co-occurrence experiments terms describing the elements and qualities of basic levels showed a qualitative accordance with expectations for example, terms describing element of beaches included shingle and sand and, those for beach qualities included being soft and deserted.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:25 Apr 2013 10:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:46
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Lecture Notes in Computer Science
Number:4857
ISSN:0302-9743
ISBN:978-3-540-76923-1
Official URL:http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-540-76925-5_8
Related URLs:http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-540-76925-5/page/1 (Publisher)
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-77800

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