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Three-dimensional forest canopy structure from terrestrial laser scanning


Danson, F Mark; Hetherington, David; Morsdorf, Felix; Koetz, Benjamin; Allgöwer, Britta (2006). Three-dimensional forest canopy structure from terrestrial laser scanning. In: International Workshop 3D Remote Sensing in Forestry, Wien (A), 14 February 2006 - 15 February 2006, 50-54.

Abstract

A terrestrial laser scanner was used to measure the three-dimensional structure of forest stands in the Swiss National Park, eastern Switzerland. Spatially coincident hemispherical photographs were taken at each sampling point and the position of each point was determined using differential GPS. A scanner model was derived in order to determine the expected number of laser shots in all directions, and these data were compared with the measured number of laser hits to determine directional gap fraction at nine sampling points. Directional gap fraction distributions were determined from the digital hemispherical photography and compared with distributions computed from the laser scanner data. The results showed that the measured directional gap fraction distributions were similar for both hemispherical photography and terrestrial laser scanner data with a high degree of precision in the area of overlap of orthogonal laser scans. Unlike hemispherical photography the laser scanner data offer semi-automatic measurement of gap fraction distributions, plus additional three-dimensional information about tree height, gap size distributions and foliage distributions.

A terrestrial laser scanner was used to measure the three-dimensional structure of forest stands in the Swiss National Park, eastern Switzerland. Spatially coincident hemispherical photographs were taken at each sampling point and the position of each point was determined using differential GPS. A scanner model was derived in order to determine the expected number of laser shots in all directions, and these data were compared with the measured number of laser hits to determine directional gap fraction at nine sampling points. Directional gap fraction distributions were determined from the digital hemispherical photography and compared with distributions computed from the laser scanner data. The results showed that the measured directional gap fraction distributions were similar for both hemispherical photography and terrestrial laser scanner data with a high degree of precision in the area of overlap of orthogonal laser scans. Unlike hemispherical photography the laser scanner data offer semi-automatic measurement of gap fraction distributions, plus additional three-dimensional information about tree height, gap size distributions and foliage distributions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:15 February 2006
Deposited On:29 Apr 2013 12:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:46
Publisher:Institute of Surveying, Remote Sensing and Land Information University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU)
Related URLs:http://www.rali.boku.ac.at/fileadmin/_/H85/H857/workshops/3drsforestry/Proceedings_3D_Remote_Sensing_2006_rev_20070129.pdf (Organisation)
http://www.rali.boku.ac.at/3drsforestry.html
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-77859

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