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What good are character strengths beyond subjective well-being? The contribution of the good character on self-reported health-oriented behavior, physical fitness, and the subjective health status


Proyer, Rene T; Gander, Fabian; Wellenzohn, Sara; Ruch, Willibald (2013). What good are character strengths beyond subjective well-being? The contribution of the good character on self-reported health-oriented behavior, physical fitness, and the subjective health status. Journal of Positive Psychology, 8(3):222-232.

Abstract

Character strengths were tested in relation to subjective (life satisfaction) and physical (self-evaluated health and physical fitness) well-being (440 adults). Health-behaviors and the mediating role of health-behaviors in explaining the relationship between character and well-being were also considered. Emotional, intellectual strengths and strengths of the heart were positively associated with life satisfaction and physical fitness. Emotional strengths correlated positively with the self-evaluation of feeling healthy. All strengths (except for modesty and religiousness) were related to health-behaviors; e.g. healthy eating and watching ones food consumption were associated with self-regulation and intellectual strengths. Health behaviors partially mediated the relation of broader strengths factors on subjective and physical well-being. The largest indirect effects were found for leading an active way of life. The study suggests that there are positive relations between character strengths and subjective but also physical well-being. Furthermore, potential mechanisms, which might account for these relations (i.e. health-behaviors) are assessed.

Abstract

Character strengths were tested in relation to subjective (life satisfaction) and physical (self-evaluated health and physical fitness) well-being (440 adults). Health-behaviors and the mediating role of health-behaviors in explaining the relationship between character and well-being were also considered. Emotional, intellectual strengths and strengths of the heart were positively associated with life satisfaction and physical fitness. Emotional strengths correlated positively with the self-evaluation of feeling healthy. All strengths (except for modesty and religiousness) were related to health-behaviors; e.g. healthy eating and watching ones food consumption were associated with self-regulation and intellectual strengths. Health behaviors partially mediated the relation of broader strengths factors on subjective and physical well-being. The largest indirect effects were found for leading an active way of life. The study suggests that there are positive relations between character strengths and subjective but also physical well-being. Furthermore, potential mechanisms, which might account for these relations (i.e. health-behaviors) are assessed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:08 May 2013 11:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:47
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1743-9760
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2013.777767

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