UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Caregiver rating bias in mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer's disease: impact of caregiver burden and depression on dyadic rating discrepancy across domains


Pfeifer, Livia; Drobetz, Reinhard; Fankhauser, Sonja; Mortby, Moyra E; Maercker, Andreas; Forstmeier, Simon (2013). Caregiver rating bias in mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer's disease: impact of caregiver burden and depression on dyadic rating discrepancy across domains. International Psychogeriatrics, 25(08):1345-1355.

Abstract

ABSTRACT Background: Caregivers of individuals with dementia are biased in their rating of mental health measures of the care receiver. This study examines caregiver burden and depression as predictors of this bias for mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer's disease in different domains. Methods: The sample consisted of 202 persons: 60 with mild cognitive impairment, 41 with mild Alzheimer's disease, and 101 caregivers. Discrepancy scores were calculated by subtracting the mean caregiver score from the respective mean patient score on the following assessment instruments: the Geriatric Depression Scale, Apathy Evaluation Scale, Bayer-Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Quality of Life-AD scale. Caregiver burden and depression were assessed by the Zarit Burden Interview and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients were low for apathy (0.38), daily functioning (0.38), and quality of life (0.30) and moderate for depression (0.49). These domains showed negative rating discrepancies, which indicates caregiver rating bias for all four domains. Regression analyses revealed that caregiver burden significantly contributed to explaining these discrepancies in the domains apathy, daily functioning, and quality of life. Conclusion: Caregiver rating bias can be attributed to caregiver burden. When caregiver burden is present, data based on caregiver ratings should therefore be interpreted with caution.

ABSTRACT Background: Caregivers of individuals with dementia are biased in their rating of mental health measures of the care receiver. This study examines caregiver burden and depression as predictors of this bias for mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer's disease in different domains. Methods: The sample consisted of 202 persons: 60 with mild cognitive impairment, 41 with mild Alzheimer's disease, and 101 caregivers. Discrepancy scores were calculated by subtracting the mean caregiver score from the respective mean patient score on the following assessment instruments: the Geriatric Depression Scale, Apathy Evaluation Scale, Bayer-Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Quality of Life-AD scale. Caregiver burden and depression were assessed by the Zarit Burden Interview and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients were low for apathy (0.38), daily functioning (0.38), and quality of life (0.30) and moderate for depression (0.49). These domains showed negative rating discrepancies, which indicates caregiver rating bias for all four domains. Regression analyses revealed that caregiver burden significantly contributed to explaining these discrepancies in the domains apathy, daily functioning, and quality of life. Conclusion: Caregiver rating bias can be attributed to caregiver burden. When caregiver burden is present, data based on caregiver ratings should therefore be interpreted with caution.

Citations

13 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 22 May 2013
23 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Psychotherapeutisches Zentrum des Psychologischen Instituts UZH DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Date:2013
Deposited On:22 May 2013 09:56
Last Modified:19 Jul 2016 07:34
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:1041-6102
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S1041610213000562
PubMed ID:23651733
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-78130

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 147kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations