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Working memory for cross-domain sequences


Farrell, Simon; Oberauer, Klaus (2014). Working memory for cross-domain sequences. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 67(1):33-44.

Abstract

How is information from different content domains bound together into a representation of the whole sequence? Several theories predict that mixing information from different domains specifically impairs the ordering of information from different domains, whereas ordering within domains might be enhanced. In contrast, domain-general models-in which items from different domains are simply assumed to be less confusable-predict that mixing items from different domains enhances ordering, as the list items will on average be less confusable. The results of an experiment showed an overall advantage for mixed over pure lists in ordering information, supporting the domain-general viewpoint. Simulations with a representative domain-general model-the start-end model of Henson [(1998). Short-term memory for serial order: The start-end model. Cognitive Psychology, 36, 73-137] -showed that the model gave a satisfactory account of the data. Together, the data and simulations lend evidence to the idea that a domain-general mechanism is responsible for ordering stimuli from different domains, and that domain-specific effects are attributable to the relative similarity of item representations.

How is information from different content domains bound together into a representation of the whole sequence? Several theories predict that mixing information from different domains specifically impairs the ordering of information from different domains, whereas ordering within domains might be enhanced. In contrast, domain-general models-in which items from different domains are simply assumed to be less confusable-predict that mixing items from different domains enhances ordering, as the list items will on average be less confusable. The results of an experiment showed an overall advantage for mixed over pure lists in ordering information, supporting the domain-general viewpoint. Simulations with a representative domain-general model-the start-end model of Henson [(1998). Short-term memory for serial order: The start-end model. Cognitive Psychology, 36, 73-137] -showed that the model gave a satisfactory account of the data. Together, the data and simulations lend evidence to the idea that a domain-general mechanism is responsible for ordering stimuli from different domains, and that domain-specific effects are attributable to the relative similarity of item representations.

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2014
Deposited On:27 May 2013 08:48
Last Modified:26 Aug 2016 09:57
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1747-0218
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2013.795177
PubMed ID:23682972

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