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Motorcycling over the Ofenpass: perception of the Swiss National Park and the Ofenpass from the perspective of motorcyclists


Jauss, Andrea; Backhaus, Norman (2013). Motorcycling over the Ofenpass: perception of the Swiss National Park and the Ofenpass from the perspective of motorcyclists. Eco.mont, 5(1):19-26.

Abstract

Visitors to conservation areas rarely expect to hear engine noise while hiking through pristine natural surroundings. Rather, they expect the absence of human induced emissions and therefore react sensitively to unnatural noise. Many visitors of the Swiss National Park – our case study area – are disturbed by noise emissions of mo- torcycles driving over the Ofenpass, a road that runs right through the park. Some of them are calling for a reduction of this noise or even for a ban of motorcycles on the Ofenpass road. Motorcyclists, however, are also spending money in the region and contribute to the economic livelihood of its inhabitants. The article focuses on motor- cyclists and their perception of the park and the noise they are producing. In-depth information about this special practice in the park region was gathered through a triangulation between qualitative interviews, quantitative questionnaires and partici- pant observation. The results show that motorcyclists are a heterogeneous group of tourists, who fulfil their driving passion and lust for travel through their hobby. The majority of them are aware of the noise problem and other emissions they produce and demonstrate an understanding for potential measures to reduce noise. The arti- cle concludes with recommendations for mitigating problems related to motorcycling and noise emissions in protected areas.

Visitors to conservation areas rarely expect to hear engine noise while hiking through pristine natural surroundings. Rather, they expect the absence of human induced emissions and therefore react sensitively to unnatural noise. Many visitors of the Swiss National Park – our case study area – are disturbed by noise emissions of mo- torcycles driving over the Ofenpass, a road that runs right through the park. Some of them are calling for a reduction of this noise or even for a ban of motorcycles on the Ofenpass road. Motorcyclists, however, are also spending money in the region and contribute to the economic livelihood of its inhabitants. The article focuses on motor- cyclists and their perception of the park and the noise they are producing. In-depth information about this special practice in the park region was gathered through a triangulation between qualitative interviews, quantitative questionnaires and partici- pant observation. The results show that motorcyclists are a heterogeneous group of tourists, who fulfil their driving passion and lust for travel through their hobby. The majority of them are aware of the noise problem and other emissions they produce and demonstrate an understanding for potential measures to reduce noise. The arti- cle concludes with recommendations for mitigating problems related to motorcycling and noise emissions in protected areas.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:26 Jun 2013 15:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:49
Publisher:Innsbruck University Press
ISSN:2073-106X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1553/ecomont-5-1s19
Official URL:http://hw.oeaw.ac.at/eco.mont_collection?frames=yes
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-78726

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