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Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNMCC): Potential histopathologic predictors.


Haerle, S K; Shiau, C; Goldstein, D P; Qiu, X; Erovic, Bn M; Ghazarian, D; Xu, W; Irish, J C (2013). Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNMCC): Potential histopathologic predictors. The Laryngoscope, 123(12):3043-3048.

Abstract

Objective: To identify or confirm any new or suggested independent histopathological predictors in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) of the head and neck (HN) correlated with outcome. Study design: Retrospective chart and pathology review. Methods: Between 1990-2010, 58 patients with HNMCC were identified for study. Pathologic specimens were reviewed and evaluated for independent prognostic factors and correlated with locoregional recurrence and disease specific survival. Results: The 2- and 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 72.7%, and 63.6%, respectively. The local and regional recurrence rates were 12.0% and 24.1%, respectively. 25.9% of the patients developed distant metastases during follow-up. Tumor size (<1cm vs. >1cm) and the presence of a positive deep resection margin were independently found to be significantly associated with regional recurrence (p=0.01, and p=0.04, respectively). No other prognostic factors could be identified. Conclusion: Adjuvant radiotherapy cannot remediate a positive resection margin. Given these results consideration for revision surgery should be considered for a positive deep margin. Frozen section analysis may help to define the margins in this invasive and aggressive disease.

Objective: To identify or confirm any new or suggested independent histopathological predictors in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) of the head and neck (HN) correlated with outcome. Study design: Retrospective chart and pathology review. Methods: Between 1990-2010, 58 patients with HNMCC were identified for study. Pathologic specimens were reviewed and evaluated for independent prognostic factors and correlated with locoregional recurrence and disease specific survival. Results: The 2- and 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 72.7%, and 63.6%, respectively. The local and regional recurrence rates were 12.0% and 24.1%, respectively. 25.9% of the patients developed distant metastases during follow-up. Tumor size (<1cm vs. >1cm) and the presence of a positive deep resection margin were independently found to be significantly associated with regional recurrence (p=0.01, and p=0.04, respectively). No other prognostic factors could be identified. Conclusion: Adjuvant radiotherapy cannot remediate a positive resection margin. Given these results consideration for revision surgery should be considered for a positive deep margin. Frozen section analysis may help to define the margins in this invasive and aggressive disease.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:04 Jul 2013 07:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:51
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0023-852X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.24233
PubMed ID:23754774

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