UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Hydrocephalus in 389 patients with aneurysm-associated subarachnoid hemorrhage


Woernle, Christoph M; Winkler, Kerstin M L; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Haile, Sarah R; Bellut, David; Neidert, Marian C; Bozinov, Oliver; Krayenbühl, Niklaus; Bernays, René-Ludwig (2013). Hydrocephalus in 389 patients with aneurysm-associated subarachnoid hemorrhage. Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 20(6):824-826.

Abstract

Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) often leads to hydrocephalus, which is commonly treated by placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. There is controversy over which factors affect the need for such treatment. In this study, data were prospectively collected from 389 consecutive patients who presented with an aneurysm-associated SAH at a single center. External ventricular drainage placement was performed as part of the treatment for acute hydrocephalus, and VP shunts were placed in patients with chronic hydrocephalus. The data were retrospectively analyzed using two-sample t-tests, Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analysis. Overall, shunt dependency occurred in 91 of the 389 patients (23.4%). Using logistic regression analysis, two factors were found to be significantly associated with VP shunt placement: an initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8-14 (8-14 versus 3-7, p=0.016; 15 versus 3-7, p=0.55); and aneurysm coiling (p=0.017). Patients with an initial GCS score of 8-14 after aneurysm-associated SAH had a 2.5-fold higher risk of receiving a VP shunt than those with a GCS score of 3-7. Those with a GCS of 15 had a 50% lower risk of becoming shunt dependent than did the subgroup with a GCS score of 8-14. To clarify and strengthen these observations, prospective, randomized trials are needed.

Abstract

Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) often leads to hydrocephalus, which is commonly treated by placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. There is controversy over which factors affect the need for such treatment. In this study, data were prospectively collected from 389 consecutive patients who presented with an aneurysm-associated SAH at a single center. External ventricular drainage placement was performed as part of the treatment for acute hydrocephalus, and VP shunts were placed in patients with chronic hydrocephalus. The data were retrospectively analyzed using two-sample t-tests, Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analysis. Overall, shunt dependency occurred in 91 of the 389 patients (23.4%). Using logistic regression analysis, two factors were found to be significantly associated with VP shunt placement: an initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8-14 (8-14 versus 3-7, p=0.016; 15 versus 3-7, p=0.55); and aneurysm coiling (p=0.017). Patients with an initial GCS score of 8-14 after aneurysm-associated SAH had a 2.5-fold higher risk of receiving a VP shunt than those with a GCS score of 3-7. Those with a GCS of 15 had a 50% lower risk of becoming shunt dependent than did the subgroup with a GCS score of 8-14. To clarify and strengthen these observations, prospective, randomized trials are needed.

Citations

20 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 10 Jul 2013
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:10 Jul 2013 06:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:51
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0967-5868
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2012.07.015
PubMed ID:23562295

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 182kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations