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Brain tissue oxygen saturation increases during the night in adolescents


Metz, Andreas Jaakko; Pugin, Fiona; Huber, Reto; Achermann, Peter; Wolf, Martin (2013). Brain tissue oxygen saturation increases during the night in adolescents. In: Van Huffel, Sabine; Naulaers, Gunnar; Caicedo, Alexander; Bruley, Duane F; Harrison, David K. Oxygen Transport to Tissue XXXV. New York: Springer, 113-119.

Abstract

How does the oxygen metabolism change during sleep? We aimed to measure the change in brain tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) before and after sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) using an in-house developed sensor. According to the synaptic homeostasis hypothesis [1], synaptic downscaling during sleep would result in reduced energy consumption. Thus, this reduced energy demands should be reflected in the oxygen metabolism and StO2. Thirteen nights of 7 male subjects (age 11-16 years, one subject contributed only one night, all others two) were included in the analysis. We performed NIRS measurements throughout the entire night. The NIRS sensor was placed close to electrode position Fp1 (international 10/20 system), over the left frontal cortex. Absolute StO2 and total haemoglobin (tHb) were calculated from the NIRS measurements using a self-calibrating method [2]. StO2 and tHb during the awake period prior to sleep and after awakening were compared. The subjects were instructed to lie in bed in the same position before and after sleep. Values of the two nights were averaged for each subject. Furthermore, a linear regression line was fit through the all-night StO2 recordings. We found an increase in StO2 by 4.32 ± 1.76 % (mean ± SD, paired t-test p < 0.001, n = 7) in the morning compared to evening, while tHb did not change (1.02 ± 6.81 μM p = 0.704, n = 7). Since the tHb remained at a similar level after sleep, this increase in StO2 indicates that in the morning more oxygenated blood and less deoxygenated blood was present in the brain compared to the evening. The slope of the regression line was 0.37 ± 0.13 % h(-1) leading to a similar increase of StO2 in the course of sleep. This may be interpreted as a reduced oxygen consumption or energy metabolism after sleep.

How does the oxygen metabolism change during sleep? We aimed to measure the change in brain tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) before and after sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) using an in-house developed sensor. According to the synaptic homeostasis hypothesis [1], synaptic downscaling during sleep would result in reduced energy consumption. Thus, this reduced energy demands should be reflected in the oxygen metabolism and StO2. Thirteen nights of 7 male subjects (age 11-16 years, one subject contributed only one night, all others two) were included in the analysis. We performed NIRS measurements throughout the entire night. The NIRS sensor was placed close to electrode position Fp1 (international 10/20 system), over the left frontal cortex. Absolute StO2 and total haemoglobin (tHb) were calculated from the NIRS measurements using a self-calibrating method [2]. StO2 and tHb during the awake period prior to sleep and after awakening were compared. The subjects were instructed to lie in bed in the same position before and after sleep. Values of the two nights were averaged for each subject. Furthermore, a linear regression line was fit through the all-night StO2 recordings. We found an increase in StO2 by 4.32 ± 1.76 % (mean ± SD, paired t-test p < 0.001, n = 7) in the morning compared to evening, while tHb did not change (1.02 ± 6.81 μM p = 0.704, n = 7). Since the tHb remained at a similar level after sleep, this increase in StO2 indicates that in the morning more oxygenated blood and less deoxygenated blood was present in the brain compared to the evening. The slope of the regression line was 0.37 ± 0.13 % h(-1) leading to a similar increase of StO2 in the course of sleep. This may be interpreted as a reduced oxygen consumption or energy metabolism after sleep.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
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Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:31 Jul 2013 12:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:53
Publisher:Springer
Number:789
ISSN:0065-2598
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7411-1_16
PubMed ID:23852484
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-79556

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