UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Menschenhandel: Wer ist Täter, wer ist Opfer? - Zur Konstruktion einer Politik


Uhl, B H; Vorheyer, C (2006). Menschenhandel: Wer ist Täter, wer ist Opfer? - Zur Konstruktion einer Politik. Osteuropa, 56(6):21-33.

Abstract

Numerous international state organisations have taken up human trafficking in recent years. They all claim to be protecting human rights. In fact, the political discourse of human trafficking is influenced above all by criminological thinking and revolves around strengthening and defending nation-state or supranational borders. As a result, the people affected by human trafficking are not helped, nor are the structural causes fought.

Numerous international state organisations have taken up human trafficking in recent years. They all claim to be protecting human rights. In fact, the political discourse of human trafficking is influenced above all by criminological thinking and revolves around strengthening and defending nation-state or supranational borders. As a result, the people affected by human trafficking are not helped, nor are the structural causes fought.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:German
Date:2006
Deposited On:12 Aug 2013 06:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:53
Publisher:BWV - Berliner Wissenschafts Verlag GmbH / Deutsche Gesellschaft für Osteuropakunde
ISSN:0030-6428
Additional Information:Alternativer Titel: Täterprofile und Opferbilder. Die Logik der internationalen Menschenhandelspolitik
Related URLs:http://www.osteuropa.dgo-online.org/issues/2006

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations