UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Increased porosity of electrospun hybrid scaffolds improved bladder tissue regeneration


Maya, Horst; Vincent, Milleret; Nötzli, Sarah; Madduri, Srinivas; Tullio, Sulser; Rita, Gobet; Eberli, Daniel (2014). Increased porosity of electrospun hybrid scaffolds improved bladder tissue regeneration. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, 102(7):2116-2124.

Abstract

The object of this study was to investigate the role of scaffold porosity on tissue ingrowth using hybrid scaffolds consisting of bladder acellular matrix and electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microfibers that mimic the morphological characteristics of the bladder wall in vitro and in vivo. We compared single-spun (SS) PLGA scaffolds with more porous cospun (CS) scaffolds (PLGA and polyethylene glycol). Scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seeded, and proliferation and histological assays were performed. Sixteen rats were subjected to augmentation cystoplasty with seeded SS or CS scaffolds, morphological, and histological studies were performed 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. The porosities of SS and CS scaffolds were 73.1 ± 2.9% and 80.9 ± 1.5%, respectively. The in vitro evaluation revealed significantly deeper cell migration into CS scaffolds. The in vivo evaluation showed significant shrinkage of SS scaffolds (p = 0.019). The histological analysis revealed a bladder wall-like structure with urothelial lining and SMC infiltration in both groups. The microvessel density was significantly increased in the CS scaffolds (p < 0.001). Increasing the porosity of electrospun hybrid scaffolds is an effective strategy to enhance cell proliferation and distribution in vitro and tissue ingrowth in vivo.

The object of this study was to investigate the role of scaffold porosity on tissue ingrowth using hybrid scaffolds consisting of bladder acellular matrix and electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microfibers that mimic the morphological characteristics of the bladder wall in vitro and in vivo. We compared single-spun (SS) PLGA scaffolds with more porous cospun (CS) scaffolds (PLGA and polyethylene glycol). Scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seeded, and proliferation and histological assays were performed. Sixteen rats were subjected to augmentation cystoplasty with seeded SS or CS scaffolds, morphological, and histological studies were performed 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. The porosities of SS and CS scaffolds were 73.1 ± 2.9% and 80.9 ± 1.5%, respectively. The in vitro evaluation revealed significantly deeper cell migration into CS scaffolds. The in vivo evaluation showed significant shrinkage of SS scaffolds (p = 0.019). The histological analysis revealed a bladder wall-like structure with urothelial lining and SMC infiltration in both groups. The microvessel density was significantly increased in the CS scaffolds (p < 0.001). Increasing the porosity of electrospun hybrid scaffolds is an effective strategy to enhance cell proliferation and distribution in vitro and tissue ingrowth in vivo.

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Obstetrics
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Urological Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:22 Aug 2013 10:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:55
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1549-3296
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.34889
PubMed ID:23893914

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations