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Adipose tissue inflammation contributes to short-term high-fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance


Wiedemann, Michael S F; Wueest, Stephan; Item, Flurin; Schoenle, Eugen J; Konrad, Daniel (2013). Adipose tissue inflammation contributes to short-term high-fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance. American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, 305(3):E388-E395.

Abstract

High-fat feeding for 3-4 days impairs glucose tolerance and hepatic insulin sensitivity. However, it remains unclear whether the evolving hepatic insulin resistance is due to acute lipid overload or the result of induced adipose tissue inflammation and consequent dysfunctional adipose tissue-liver cross-talk. In the present study, feeding C57Bl6/J mice a fat-enriched diet [high-fat diet (HFD)] for 4 days induced glucose intolerance, hepatic insulin resistance (as assessed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies), and hepatic steatosis as well as adipose tissue inflammation (i.e., TNFα expression) compared with standard chow-fed mice. Adipocyte-specific depletion of the antiapoptotic/anti-inflammatory factor Fas (CD95) attenuated adipose tissue inflammation and improved glucose tolerance as well as hepatic insulin sensitivity without altering the level of hepatic steatosis induced by HFD. In summary, our results identify adipose tissue inflammation and resulting dysfunctional adipose tissue-liver cross-talk as an early event in the development of HFD-induced hepatic insulin resistance.

Abstract

High-fat feeding for 3-4 days impairs glucose tolerance and hepatic insulin sensitivity. However, it remains unclear whether the evolving hepatic insulin resistance is due to acute lipid overload or the result of induced adipose tissue inflammation and consequent dysfunctional adipose tissue-liver cross-talk. In the present study, feeding C57Bl6/J mice a fat-enriched diet [high-fat diet (HFD)] for 4 days induced glucose intolerance, hepatic insulin resistance (as assessed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies), and hepatic steatosis as well as adipose tissue inflammation (i.e., TNFα expression) compared with standard chow-fed mice. Adipocyte-specific depletion of the antiapoptotic/anti-inflammatory factor Fas (CD95) attenuated adipose tissue inflammation and improved glucose tolerance as well as hepatic insulin sensitivity without altering the level of hepatic steatosis induced by HFD. In summary, our results identify adipose tissue inflammation and resulting dysfunctional adipose tissue-liver cross-talk as an early event in the development of HFD-induced hepatic insulin resistance.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:23 Aug 2013 06:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:55
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0193-1849
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation, Wolfermann Nägeli-Stiftung, Forschungskredit Universität Zürich
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpendo.00179.2013
PubMed ID:23736545

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