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Hierarchical nuclear and cytoplasmic genetic architectures for plant growth and defense within Arabidopsis


Joseph, Bindu; Corwin, Jason A; Züst, Tobias; Li, Baohua; Iravani, Majid; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Turnbull, Lindsay A; Kliebenstein, Daniel J (2013). Hierarchical nuclear and cytoplasmic genetic architectures for plant growth and defense within Arabidopsis. Plant Cell, 25(6):1929-1945.

Abstract

To understand how genetic architecture translates between phenotypic levels, we mapped the genetic architecture of growth and defense within the Arabidopsis thaliana Kas × Tsu recombinant inbred line population. We measured plant growth using traditional size measurements and size-corrected growth rates. This population contains genetic variation in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes, allowing us to separate their contributions. The cytoplasmic genome regulated a significant variance in growth but not defense, which was due to cytonuclear epistasis. Furthermore, growth adhered to an infinitesimal model of genetic architecture, while defense metabolism was more of a moderate-effect model. We found a lack of concordance between quantitative trait loci (QTL) regulating defense and those regulating growth. Given the published evidence proving the link between glucosinolates and growth, this is likely a false negative result caused by the limited population size. This size limitation creates an inability to test the entire potential genetic landscape possible between these two parents. We uncovered a significant effect of glucosinolates on growth once we accounted for allelic differences in growth QTLs. Therefore, other growth QTLs can mask the effects of defense upon growth. Investigating direct links across phenotypic hierarchies is fraught with difficulty; we identify issues complicating this analysis.

To understand how genetic architecture translates between phenotypic levels, we mapped the genetic architecture of growth and defense within the Arabidopsis thaliana Kas × Tsu recombinant inbred line population. We measured plant growth using traditional size measurements and size-corrected growth rates. This population contains genetic variation in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes, allowing us to separate their contributions. The cytoplasmic genome regulated a significant variance in growth but not defense, which was due to cytonuclear epistasis. Furthermore, growth adhered to an infinitesimal model of genetic architecture, while defense metabolism was more of a moderate-effect model. We found a lack of concordance between quantitative trait loci (QTL) regulating defense and those regulating growth. Given the published evidence proving the link between glucosinolates and growth, this is likely a false negative result caused by the limited population size. This size limitation creates an inability to test the entire potential genetic landscape possible between these two parents. We uncovered a significant effect of glucosinolates on growth once we accounted for allelic differences in growth QTLs. Therefore, other growth QTLs can mask the effects of defense upon growth. Investigating direct links across phenotypic hierarchies is fraught with difficulty; we identify issues complicating this analysis.

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21 citations in Web of Science®
20 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Sep 2013 07:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:58
Publisher:American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN:1040-4651
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1105/tpc.113.112615

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