UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The association of a variant in the cell cycle control gene CCND1 and obesity on the development of asthma in the Swiss SAPALDIA study


Thun, Gian Andri; Imboden, Medea; Berger, Wolfgang; Rochat, Thierry; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M (2013). The association of a variant in the cell cycle control gene CCND1 and obesity on the development of asthma in the Swiss SAPALDIA study. Journal of Asthma, 50(2):147-154.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The molecular mechanisms underlying the association between obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and asthma are poorly understood. Since shifts in the fate of bronchial cells due to low-grade systemic inflammation may provide a possible explanation, we investigated whether two of the best documented functional variants in cell cycle control genes modify the obesity-asthma association.
METHODS: We genotyped 5930 SAPALDIA cohort participants for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs9344 in the cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) and rs1042522 in the gene encoding tumor protein 53 (TP53). We assessed the independent association of these SNPs and obesity with asthma prevalence and incidence.
RESULTS: The CCND1 SNP modified the association between obesity and asthma prevalence (p(interaction )= 0.03). The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for reporting a physician diagnosis of asthma at baseline, comparing obese with non-obese participants, were 1.09 (0.51-2.33), 1.64 (0.94-2.88), and 3.51 (1.63-7.53) for GG, GA, and AA genotypes, respectively. We found comparable genotype differences for incident asthma within the 11 years of follow-up. As for the TP53 SNP, the interactions with obesity status with respect to asthma were not statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that obesity may contribute to asthma and associated tissue remodeling by modifying the processes related to the CCND1 gene activity.

OBJECTIVE: The molecular mechanisms underlying the association between obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and asthma are poorly understood. Since shifts in the fate of bronchial cells due to low-grade systemic inflammation may provide a possible explanation, we investigated whether two of the best documented functional variants in cell cycle control genes modify the obesity-asthma association.
METHODS: We genotyped 5930 SAPALDIA cohort participants for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs9344 in the cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) and rs1042522 in the gene encoding tumor protein 53 (TP53). We assessed the independent association of these SNPs and obesity with asthma prevalence and incidence.
RESULTS: The CCND1 SNP modified the association between obesity and asthma prevalence (p(interaction )= 0.03). The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for reporting a physician diagnosis of asthma at baseline, comparing obese with non-obese participants, were 1.09 (0.51-2.33), 1.64 (0.94-2.88), and 3.51 (1.63-7.53) for GG, GA, and AA genotypes, respectively. We found comparable genotype differences for incident asthma within the 11 years of follow-up. As for the TP53 SNP, the interactions with obesity status with respect to asthma were not statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that obesity may contribute to asthma and associated tissue remodeling by modifying the processes related to the CCND1 gene activity.

Altmetrics

Downloads

45 downloads since deposited on 16 Sep 2013
24 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Molecular Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2013
Deposited On:16 Sep 2013 07:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:58
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:0277-0903
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3109/02770903.2012.757776
PubMed ID:23311506
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-80753

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 226kB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 226kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations