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Trends in smoking and lung cancer mortality in Switzerland


La Vecchia, Carlo; Levi, Fabio; Decarli, Adriano; Wietlisbach, Vincent; Negri, Eva; Gutzwiller, Felix (1988). Trends in smoking and lung cancer mortality in Switzerland. Preventive medicine, 17(6):712-724.

Abstract

Patterns of cigarette smoking in Switzerland were analyzed on the basis of sales data (available since 1924) and national health surveys conducted in the last decade. There was a steady and substantial increase in cigarettes sales up to the early 1970s. Thereafter, the curve tended to level off around an average value of 3,000 cigarettes per adult per year. According to the 1981-1983 National Health Survey, 37% of Swiss men were current smokers, 25% were ex-smokers, and 39% were never smokers. Corresponding porportions in women were 22, 11, and 67%. Among men, smoking prevalence was higher in lower social classes, and some moderate decline was apparent from survey data over the period 1975-1981 mostly in later middle-age. Trends in lung cancer death certification rates over the period 1950-1984 were analyzed using standard cross-sectional methods and a log-linear Poisson model to isolate the effects of age, birth cohort, and year of death. Mortality from lung cancer increased substantially among Swiss men between the early 1950s and the late 1970s, and levelled off (around a value of 70/100,000 men) thereafter. Among women, there has been a steady upward trend which started in the mid-1960s, and continues to climb steadily, although lung cancer mortality is still considerably lower in absolute terms (around 8/100,000 women) than in several North European countries or in North America. Cohort analyses indicate that the peak rates in men were reached by the generation born around 1910 and mortality stabilized for subsequent generations up to the 1930 birth cohort. Among females, marked increases were observed in each subsequent birth cohort. This pattern of trends is consistent with available information on smoking prevalence in successive generations, showing a peak among men for the 1910 cohort, but steady upward trends among females. Over the period 1980-1984, about 90% of lung cancer deaths among Swiss men and about 40% of those among women could be attributed to smoking (overall proportion, 85%).

Patterns of cigarette smoking in Switzerland were analyzed on the basis of sales data (available since 1924) and national health surveys conducted in the last decade. There was a steady and substantial increase in cigarettes sales up to the early 1970s. Thereafter, the curve tended to level off around an average value of 3,000 cigarettes per adult per year. According to the 1981-1983 National Health Survey, 37% of Swiss men were current smokers, 25% were ex-smokers, and 39% were never smokers. Corresponding porportions in women were 22, 11, and 67%. Among men, smoking prevalence was higher in lower social classes, and some moderate decline was apparent from survey data over the period 1975-1981 mostly in later middle-age. Trends in lung cancer death certification rates over the period 1950-1984 were analyzed using standard cross-sectional methods and a log-linear Poisson model to isolate the effects of age, birth cohort, and year of death. Mortality from lung cancer increased substantially among Swiss men between the early 1950s and the late 1970s, and levelled off (around a value of 70/100,000 men) thereafter. Among women, there has been a steady upward trend which started in the mid-1960s, and continues to climb steadily, although lung cancer mortality is still considerably lower in absolute terms (around 8/100,000 women) than in several North European countries or in North America. Cohort analyses indicate that the peak rates in men were reached by the generation born around 1910 and mortality stabilized for subsequent generations up to the 1930 birth cohort. Among females, marked increases were observed in each subsequent birth cohort. This pattern of trends is consistent with available information on smoking prevalence in successive generations, showing a peak among men for the 1910 cohort, but steady upward trends among females. Over the period 1980-1984, about 90% of lung cancer deaths among Swiss men and about 40% of those among women could be attributed to smoking (overall proportion, 85%).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1988
Deposited On:11 Sep 2013 12:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:58
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-7435
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/0091-7435(88)90090-4
PubMed ID:3244670

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