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Swelling and contraction of ferrocyanide-containing polyelectrolyte multilayers upon application of an electric potential


Grieshaber, D; Vörös, J; Zambelli, T; Ball, V; Schaaf, P; Voegel, J C; Boulmedais, F (2008). Swelling and contraction of ferrocyanide-containing polyelectrolyte multilayers upon application of an electric potential. Langmuir, 249(23):13668-13676.

Abstract

We developed a new platform at the interface of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) and electroactive polymers (EAPs) by combining the easy buildup of PEM thin films and the deformation characteristics of the EAPs. The PEM films were made of poly( l-glutamic acid) (PGA) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH). After [Fe(CN) 6] (4 -) ions (FCIV) were added, cyclic voltammetry (CV) was performed, resulting in a reversible expansion and contraction of the film. The shape change as well as the film buildup prior to the cycling were monitored in situ using the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (EC-QCM-D). Electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) images confirmed the rapid shape deformation. The process takes place in an aqueous environment under mild conditions (maximum potential of 600 mV and no pH change), which makes it a promising tool for biomedical applications. In addition, the electrochemically active films are produced using the layer-by-layer (LbL) method that is already established in biotechnology and biomaterials science; therefore, the presented approach can be readily adapted in these areas, bringing about a new possibility for the nanoscale dynamic control of coating thickness in various applications.

We developed a new platform at the interface of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) and electroactive polymers (EAPs) by combining the easy buildup of PEM thin films and the deformation characteristics of the EAPs. The PEM films were made of poly( l-glutamic acid) (PGA) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH). After [Fe(CN) 6] (4 -) ions (FCIV) were added, cyclic voltammetry (CV) was performed, resulting in a reversible expansion and contraction of the film. The shape change as well as the film buildup prior to the cycling were monitored in situ using the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (EC-QCM-D). Electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) images confirmed the rapid shape deformation. The process takes place in an aqueous environment under mild conditions (maximum potential of 600 mV and no pH change), which makes it a promising tool for biomedical applications. In addition, the electrochemically active films are produced using the layer-by-layer (LbL) method that is already established in biotechnology and biomaterials science; therefore, the presented approach can be readily adapted in these areas, bringing about a new possibility for the nanoscale dynamic control of coating thickness in various applications.

Citations

35 citations in Web of Science®
38 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:16 Dec 2008 07:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:42
Publisher:American Chemical Society
ISSN:0743-7463
Publisher DOI:10.1021/la801875u
PubMed ID:18973314

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