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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-8124

Muñoz, M; Breymann, C; García-Erce, J A; Gómez-Ramírez, S; Comin, J; Bisbe, E (2008). Efficacy and safety of intravenous iron therapy as an alternative/adjunct to allogeneic blood transfusion. Vox Sanguinis, 94(3):172-183.

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Abstract

Anaemia is a common condition among patients admitted to hospital medicosurgical departments, as well as in critically ill patients. Anaemia is more frequently due to absolute iron deficiency (e.g. chronic blood loss) or functional iron deficiency (e.g. chronic inflammatory states), with other causes being less frequent. In addition, preoperative anaemia is one of the major predictive factors for perioperative blood transfusion. In surgical patients, postoperative anaemia is mainly caused by perioperative blood loss, and it might be aggravated by inflammation-induced inhibition of erythropoietin and functional iron deficiency (a condition that cannot be corrected by the administration of oral iron). All these mechanisms may be involved in the anaemia of the critically ill. Intravenous iron administration seems to be safe, as very few severe side-effects were observed, and may result in hastened recovery from anaemia and lower transfusion requirements. However, it is noteworthy that many of the recommendations given for intravenous iron treatment are not supported by a high level of evidence and this must be borne in mind when making decisions regarding its application to a particular patient. Nonetheless, this also indicates the need for further large, randomized controlled trials on the safety and efficacy of intravenous iron for the treatment of anaemia in different clinical settings.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Obstetrics
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:12 Jan 2009 13:18
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 23:22
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0042-9007
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1423-0410.2007.01014.x
PubMed ID:18069918
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 35
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Scopus®. Citation Count: 56

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