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Oligomers of the ATPase EHD2 confine caveolae to the plasma membrane through association with actin.


Stoeber, Miriam; Stoeck, Ina Karen; Hänni, Christine; Bleck, Christopher Karl Ernst; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Helenius, Ari (2012). Oligomers of the ATPase EHD2 confine caveolae to the plasma membrane through association with actin. EMBO Journal Online, 31(10):2350-64.

Abstract

Caveolae are specialized domains present in the plasma membrane (PM) of most mammalian cell types. They function in signalling, membrane regulation, and endocytosis. We found that the Eps-15 homology domain-containing protein 2 (EHD2, an ATPase) associated with the static population of PM caveolae. Recruitment to the PM involved ATP binding, interaction with anionic lipids, and oligomerization into large complexes (60-75S) via interaction of the EH domains with intrinsic NPF/KPF motifs. Hydrolysis of ATP was essential for binding of EHD2 complexes to caveolae. EHD2 was found to undergo dynamic exchange at caveolae, a process that depended on a functional ATPase cycle. Depletion of EHD2 by siRNA or expression of a dominant-negative mutant dramatically increased the fraction of mobile caveolar vesicles coming from the PM. Overexpression of EHD2, in turn, caused confinement of cholera toxin B in caveolae. The confining role of EHD2 relied on its capacity to link caveolae to actin filaments. Thus, EHD2 likely plays a key role in adjusting the balance between PM functions of stationary caveolae and the role of caveolae as vesicular carriers.

Caveolae are specialized domains present in the plasma membrane (PM) of most mammalian cell types. They function in signalling, membrane regulation, and endocytosis. We found that the Eps-15 homology domain-containing protein 2 (EHD2, an ATPase) associated with the static population of PM caveolae. Recruitment to the PM involved ATP binding, interaction with anionic lipids, and oligomerization into large complexes (60-75S) via interaction of the EH domains with intrinsic NPF/KPF motifs. Hydrolysis of ATP was essential for binding of EHD2 complexes to caveolae. EHD2 was found to undergo dynamic exchange at caveolae, a process that depended on a functional ATPase cycle. Depletion of EHD2 by siRNA or expression of a dominant-negative mutant dramatically increased the fraction of mobile caveolar vesicles coming from the PM. Overexpression of EHD2, in turn, caused confinement of cholera toxin B in caveolae. The confining role of EHD2 relied on its capacity to link caveolae to actin filaments. Thus, EHD2 likely plays a key role in adjusting the balance between PM functions of stationary caveolae and the role of caveolae as vesicular carriers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:Special Collections > SystemsX.ch
Special Collections > SystemsX.ch > Research, Technology and Development Projects > CINA
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:24 Sep 2013 10:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:00
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0261-4189
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/emboj.2012.98
PubMed ID:22505029
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-81279

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