UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Changes in plasma lipids with psychosocial stress are related to hypertension status and the norepinephrine stress response


Wirtz, P H; Ehlert, Ulrike; Bärtschi, C; Redwine, L S; von Känel, R (2009). Changes in plasma lipids with psychosocial stress are related to hypertension status and the norepinephrine stress response. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 58(1):30-37.

Abstract

Hypertension is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Hypertensive individuals show exaggerated norepinephrine (NE) reactivity to stress. Norepinephrine is a known lipolytic factor. It is unclear if, in hypertensive individuals, stress-induced increases in NE are linked with the elevations in stress-induced circulating lipid levels. Such a mechanism could have implications for atherosclerotic plaque formation. In a cross-sectional, quasi-experimentally controlled study, 22 hypertensive and 23 normotensive men (mean +/- SEM, 45 +/- 3 years) underwent an acute standardized psychosocial stress task combining public speaking and mental arithmetic in front of an audience. We measured plasma NE and the plasma lipid profile (total cholesterol [TC], low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides) immediately before and after stress and at 20 and 60 minutes of recovery. All lipid levels were corrected for stress hemoconcentration. Compared with normotensives, hypertensives had greater TC (P = .030) and LDL-C (P = .037) stress responses. Independent of each other, mean arterial pressure (MAP) upon screening and immediate increase in NE predicted immediate stress change in TC (MAP: beta = .41, P = .003; NE: beta = .35, P = .010) and LDL-C (MAP: beta = .32, P = .024; NE: beta = .38, P = .008). Mean arterial pressure alone predicted triglycerides stress change (beta = .32, P = .043) independent of NE stress change, age, and BMI. The MAP-by-NE interaction independently predicted immediate stress change of high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (beta = -.58, P < .001) and of LDL-C (beta = -.25, P < .08). We conclude that MAP and NE stress reactivity may elicit proatherogenic changes of plasma lipids in response to acute psychosocial stress, providing one mechanism by which stress might increase cardiovascular risk in hypertension.

Abstract

Hypertension is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Hypertensive individuals show exaggerated norepinephrine (NE) reactivity to stress. Norepinephrine is a known lipolytic factor. It is unclear if, in hypertensive individuals, stress-induced increases in NE are linked with the elevations in stress-induced circulating lipid levels. Such a mechanism could have implications for atherosclerotic plaque formation. In a cross-sectional, quasi-experimentally controlled study, 22 hypertensive and 23 normotensive men (mean +/- SEM, 45 +/- 3 years) underwent an acute standardized psychosocial stress task combining public speaking and mental arithmetic in front of an audience. We measured plasma NE and the plasma lipid profile (total cholesterol [TC], low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides) immediately before and after stress and at 20 and 60 minutes of recovery. All lipid levels were corrected for stress hemoconcentration. Compared with normotensives, hypertensives had greater TC (P = .030) and LDL-C (P = .037) stress responses. Independent of each other, mean arterial pressure (MAP) upon screening and immediate increase in NE predicted immediate stress change in TC (MAP: beta = .41, P = .003; NE: beta = .35, P = .010) and LDL-C (MAP: beta = .32, P = .024; NE: beta = .38, P = .008). Mean arterial pressure alone predicted triglycerides stress change (beta = .32, P = .043) independent of NE stress change, age, and BMI. The MAP-by-NE interaction independently predicted immediate stress change of high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (beta = -.58, P < .001) and of LDL-C (beta = -.25, P < .08). We conclude that MAP and NE stress reactivity may elicit proatherogenic changes of plasma lipids in response to acute psychosocial stress, providing one mechanism by which stress might increase cardiovascular risk in hypertension.

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

56 downloads since deposited on 15 Mar 2009
22 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:15 Mar 2009 09:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:42
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0026-0495
Funders:Research Grant University of Zurich 2003 (to PHW)
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2008.08.003
PubMed ID:19059528

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations