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Single-molecule spectroscopy of cold denaturation and the temperature-induced collapse of unfolded proteins


Aznauryan, Mikayel; Nettels, Daniel; Holla, Andrea; Hofmann, Hagen; Schuler, Benjamin (2013). Single-molecule spectroscopy of cold denaturation and the temperature-induced collapse of unfolded proteins. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 135(38):14040-14043.

Abstract

Recent Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments show that heat-unfolded states of proteins become more compact with increasing temperature. At the same time, NMR results indicate that cold-denatured proteins are more expanded than heat-denatured proteins. To clarify the connection between these observations, we investigated the unfolded state of yeast frataxin, whose cold denaturation occurs at temperatures above 273 K, with single-molecule FRET. This method allows the unfolded state dimensions to be probed not only in the cold- and heat-denatured range but also in between, i.e., in the presence of folded protein, and can thus be used to link the two regimes directly. The results show a continuous compaction of unfolded frataxin from 274 to 320 K, with a slight re-expansion at higher temperatures. Cold- and heat-denatured states are thus essentially two sides of the same coin, and their behavior can be understood within the framework of the overall temperature dependence of the unfolded state dimensions.

Recent Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments show that heat-unfolded states of proteins become more compact with increasing temperature. At the same time, NMR results indicate that cold-denatured proteins are more expanded than heat-denatured proteins. To clarify the connection between these observations, we investigated the unfolded state of yeast frataxin, whose cold denaturation occurs at temperatures above 273 K, with single-molecule FRET. This method allows the unfolded state dimensions to be probed not only in the cold- and heat-denatured range but also in between, i.e., in the presence of folded protein, and can thus be used to link the two regimes directly. The results show a continuous compaction of unfolded frataxin from 274 to 320 K, with a slight re-expansion at higher temperatures. Cold- and heat-denatured states are thus essentially two sides of the same coin, and their behavior can be understood within the framework of the overall temperature dependence of the unfolded state dimensions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:07 Oct 2013 13:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:01
Publisher:American Chemical Society
ISSN:0002-7863
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1021/ja407009w
PubMed ID:24010673
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-81477

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