UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Macrophages modulate cardiac function in lipotoxic cardiomyopathy


Schilling, Joel D; Machkovech, Heather M; Kim, Alfred H J; Schwendener, Reto; Schwedwener, Reto; Schaffer, Jean E (2012). Macrophages modulate cardiac function in lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 303(11):H1366-H1373.

Abstract

Diabetes is associated with myocardial lipid accumulation and an increased risk of heart failure. Although cardiac myocyte lipid overload is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in the setting of diabetes, the mechanism(s) through which this occurs is not well understood. Increasingly, inflammation has been recognized as a key pathogenic feature of lipid excess and diabetes. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of inflammatory activation in the pathogenesis of lipotoxic cardiomyopathy using the α-myosin heavy chain promoter-driven long-chain acylCoA synthetase 1 (MHC-ACS) transgenic mouse model. We found that several inflammatory cytokines were upregulated in the myocardium of MHC-ACS mice before the onset of cardiac dysfunction, and this was accompanied by macrophage infiltration. Depletion of macrophages with liposomal clodrolip reduced the cardiac inflammatory response and improved cardiac function. Thus, in this model of lipotoxic cardiac injury, early induction of inflammation and macrophage recruitment contribute to adverse cardiac remodeling. These findings have implications for our understanding of heart failure in the setting of obesity and diabetes.

Diabetes is associated with myocardial lipid accumulation and an increased risk of heart failure. Although cardiac myocyte lipid overload is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in the setting of diabetes, the mechanism(s) through which this occurs is not well understood. Increasingly, inflammation has been recognized as a key pathogenic feature of lipid excess and diabetes. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of inflammatory activation in the pathogenesis of lipotoxic cardiomyopathy using the α-myosin heavy chain promoter-driven long-chain acylCoA synthetase 1 (MHC-ACS) transgenic mouse model. We found that several inflammatory cytokines were upregulated in the myocardium of MHC-ACS mice before the onset of cardiac dysfunction, and this was accompanied by macrophage infiltration. Depletion of macrophages with liposomal clodrolip reduced the cardiac inflammatory response and improved cardiac function. Thus, in this model of lipotoxic cardiac injury, early induction of inflammation and macrophage recruitment contribute to adverse cardiac remodeling. These findings have implications for our understanding of heart failure in the setting of obesity and diabetes.

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 15 Oct 2013
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:15 Oct 2013 15:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:01
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0363-6135
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00111.2012
PubMed ID:23042950
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-81625

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 2MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations