UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 v2.0 Assay: Consequences at the Cohort Level


Taylor, Ninon; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Egle, Alexander; Greil, Richard; Rieger, Armin; Ledergerber, Bruno; Oberkofler, Hannes (2013). Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 v2.0 Assay: Consequences at the Cohort Level. PLoS ONE, 8(8):e74024.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: High-sensitive real-time PCR assays are routinely used to monitor HIV-1 infected subjects. Inter-assay discrepancies have been described at the low viral load (VL) end, where clinical decisions regarding possible virological rebound are based.
METHODS: A retrospective study was performed to analyze frequencies of viral blips after transition to the COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan v2.0 HIV-1 assay (Taqman v2.0) in patients with prior undetectable VLs as measured with the Roche Cobas Ampliprep Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Test, v1.5 (Amplicor) and was evaluated in comparison to a group of patients monitored with the Abbott Real-time HIV-1 assay (Abbott RT) during the same period of time.
RESULTS: 85 of 373 patients with VLs below the limit of quantification with Amplicor had VLs >50 copies/mL after transition to the TaqMan v2.0 assay. Among these 74.1% had VLs ranging from 50-499 copies/mL, 22.9% had VLs >500 copies/mL. From 22 patients with initial Taqman v2.0 based VLs exceeding 500 copies/mL, 6 patients had VLs <20 copies/mL after novel VL measurement on a next visit. In our control group with VL quantification using the Abbott RT assay, only 1 patient became detectable and showed a VL of <40 copies/mL after new measurement.
CONCLUSIONS: Transition to the Taqman v2.0 assay was accompanied by an increase of quantifiable HIV-1 VLs in patients with long term viral suppression under antiretroviral therapy that might be attributed to technical shortcomings of the Taqman v2.0 assay. A high test variability at the low VL end but also beyond was observed, making meaningful clinical interpretation of viral blips derived from different assays difficult.

BACKGROUND: High-sensitive real-time PCR assays are routinely used to monitor HIV-1 infected subjects. Inter-assay discrepancies have been described at the low viral load (VL) end, where clinical decisions regarding possible virological rebound are based.
METHODS: A retrospective study was performed to analyze frequencies of viral blips after transition to the COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan v2.0 HIV-1 assay (Taqman v2.0) in patients with prior undetectable VLs as measured with the Roche Cobas Ampliprep Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Test, v1.5 (Amplicor) and was evaluated in comparison to a group of patients monitored with the Abbott Real-time HIV-1 assay (Abbott RT) during the same period of time.
RESULTS: 85 of 373 patients with VLs below the limit of quantification with Amplicor had VLs >50 copies/mL after transition to the TaqMan v2.0 assay. Among these 74.1% had VLs ranging from 50-499 copies/mL, 22.9% had VLs >500 copies/mL. From 22 patients with initial Taqman v2.0 based VLs exceeding 500 copies/mL, 6 patients had VLs <20 copies/mL after novel VL measurement on a next visit. In our control group with VL quantification using the Abbott RT assay, only 1 patient became detectable and showed a VL of <40 copies/mL after new measurement.
CONCLUSIONS: Transition to the Taqman v2.0 assay was accompanied by an increase of quantifiable HIV-1 VLs in patients with long term viral suppression under antiretroviral therapy that might be attributed to technical shortcomings of the Taqman v2.0 assay. A high test variability at the low VL end but also beyond was observed, making meaningful clinical interpretation of viral blips derived from different assays difficult.

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

55 downloads since deposited on 15 Oct 2013
25 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:15 Oct 2013 14:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:01
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1932-6203
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074024
PubMed ID:24023696
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-81655

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 143kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations