UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Contributions of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein and polymerase to strain-specific differences in murine liver pathogenicity


Bergthaler, Andreas; Merkler, Doron; Horvath, Edit; Bestmann, Lukas; Pinschewer, Daniel D (2007). Contributions of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein and polymerase to strain-specific differences in murine liver pathogenicity. Journal of General Virology, 88(Pt 2):592-603.

Abstract

Hepatic involvement is commonly observed in arenavirus infections, but the viral determinants of liver disease are only partially understood. Here we exploited newly developed reverse-genetic techniques with Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), the prototype arenavirus, to address specifically the contribution of the viral glycoprotein (GP) to liver pathogenicity. It is well established that strain WE, but not ARM, causes hepatitis in mice. We found that this property correlated with the superior capacity of WE to propagate in cultured macrophages and hepatocyte-derived cells. In mice, the ability to establish prolonged viraemia allowed the virus to propagate from initially infected Kupffer cells in the liver to neighbouring hepatocytes that underwent apoptosis. Reverse-genetic replacement of the GP in strain ARM with WE-GP resulted in only a very modest increase in liver pathogenicity, if any. Yet, an ARM-derived variant virus with a mutated polymerase gene caused severe liver disease when engineered to display WE-GP but considerably less when expressing ARM-GP. This reverse-genetic approach to an animal model of arenaviral hepatitis reveals a previously underestimated contributory role of the GP that alone is, however, insufficient to cause disease.

Hepatic involvement is commonly observed in arenavirus infections, but the viral determinants of liver disease are only partially understood. Here we exploited newly developed reverse-genetic techniques with Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), the prototype arenavirus, to address specifically the contribution of the viral glycoprotein (GP) to liver pathogenicity. It is well established that strain WE, but not ARM, causes hepatitis in mice. We found that this property correlated with the superior capacity of WE to propagate in cultured macrophages and hepatocyte-derived cells. In mice, the ability to establish prolonged viraemia allowed the virus to propagate from initially infected Kupffer cells in the liver to neighbouring hepatocytes that underwent apoptosis. Reverse-genetic replacement of the GP in strain ARM with WE-GP resulted in only a very modest increase in liver pathogenicity, if any. Yet, an ARM-derived variant virus with a mutated polymerase gene caused severe liver disease when engineered to display WE-GP but considerably less when expressing ARM-GP. This reverse-genetic approach to an animal model of arenaviral hepatitis reveals a previously underestimated contributory role of the GP that alone is, however, insufficient to cause disease.

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Date:2007
Deposited On:09 Oct 2013 14:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:02
Publisher:Society for General Microbiology
ISSN:0022-1317
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1099/vir.0.82428-0
PubMed ID:17251578

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations