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Evidence for oxidative stress at elevated plasma thiol levels in chronic exposure to carbon disulfide (CS2) and coronary heart disease


Wronska-Nofer, Teresa; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Stetkiewicz, Jan; Wierzbicka, Malgorzata; Bolinska, Halina; Fobker, Manfred; Schulte, Helmut; Assmann, Gerd; von Eckardstein, Arnold (2007). Evidence for oxidative stress at elevated plasma thiol levels in chronic exposure to carbon disulfide (CS2) and coronary heart disease. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases (NMCD), 17(7):546-553.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Oxidative stress in plasma may be promoted by plasma thiols such as homocysteine. However, other thiols such as glutathione may also exert antioxidant effects in vitro and in vivo. To further investigate whether plasma thiols act as prooxidants or antioxidants, we compared plasma oxidative status in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and in subjects occupationally exposed to carbon disulfide (CS(2)). METHODS: Fifty-five subjects chronically exposed to CS(2), 53 CHD patients, and 52 healthy controls were examined. To assess plasma oxidative status, concentrations of thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidative capacity (TAC), as well as ferritin and ceruloplasmin were determined. Antioxidative reserve was assessed by the determination of vitamine E, uric acid, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathion peroxidase. In addition, protein and non-protein plasma thiol levels were measured. RESULTS: Patients in both groups had increased levels of plasma thiols as compared to controls: CS(2)-exposed subjects presented with increased levels of thiols associated with plasma proteins, whereas CHD patients presented with elevated total homocysteine and cysteine levels. TBARS were significantly increased and TAC was significantly decreased both in CS(2)-exposed subjects and in CHD patients. In addition decreased activity of glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidative enzyme inhibited by thiol-containing compounds, was noted in both groups. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that regardless of their metabolic origin increased thiols are associated with increased oxidative stress in plasma.

OBJECTIVES: Oxidative stress in plasma may be promoted by plasma thiols such as homocysteine. However, other thiols such as glutathione may also exert antioxidant effects in vitro and in vivo. To further investigate whether plasma thiols act as prooxidants or antioxidants, we compared plasma oxidative status in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and in subjects occupationally exposed to carbon disulfide (CS(2)). METHODS: Fifty-five subjects chronically exposed to CS(2), 53 CHD patients, and 52 healthy controls were examined. To assess plasma oxidative status, concentrations of thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidative capacity (TAC), as well as ferritin and ceruloplasmin were determined. Antioxidative reserve was assessed by the determination of vitamine E, uric acid, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathion peroxidase. In addition, protein and non-protein plasma thiol levels were measured. RESULTS: Patients in both groups had increased levels of plasma thiols as compared to controls: CS(2)-exposed subjects presented with increased levels of thiols associated with plasma proteins, whereas CHD patients presented with elevated total homocysteine and cysteine levels. TBARS were significantly increased and TAC was significantly decreased both in CS(2)-exposed subjects and in CHD patients. In addition decreased activity of glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidative enzyme inhibited by thiol-containing compounds, was noted in both groups. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that regardless of their metabolic origin increased thiols are associated with increased oxidative stress in plasma.

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12 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:09 Oct 2013 13:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:02
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0939-4753
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2006.03.002
PubMed ID:17134958

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