UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Perineal stapled prolapse resection for external rectal prolapse: is it worthwhile in the long-term?


Tschuor, C; Limani, P; Nocito, A; Dindo, D; Clavien, P A; Hahnloser, D (2013). Perineal stapled prolapse resection for external rectal prolapse: is it worthwhile in the long-term? Techniques in Coloproctology, 17(5):537-540.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Perineal stapled prolapse (PSP) resection is a novel operation for treating external rectal prolapse. However, no long-term results have been reported in the literature. This study analyses the long-term recurrence rate, functional outcome, and morbidity associated with PSP resection. METHODS: Nine consecutive patients undergoing PSP resection between 2007 and 2011 were prospectively followed. Surgery was performed by the same surgeons in a standardised technique. Recurrence rate, functional outcome, and complication grade were prospectively assessed. RESULTS: All 9 patients undergoing PSP resection were investigated. The median age was 72 years (range 25-88 years). No intraoperative complications occurred. Faecal incontinence, preoperatively present in 2 patients, worsened postoperatively in one patient (Vaizey 18-22). One patient developed new-onset faecal incontinence (Vaizey 18). The median obstructive defecation syndrome score decreased postoperatively significantly from 11 (median; range 8-13) to 5 (median; range 4-8) (p < 0.005). At a median follow-up of 40 months (range 14-58 months), the prolapse recurrence rate was 44 % (4/9 patients). CONCLUSIONS: The PSP resection is a fast and safe procedure associated with low morbidity. However, the poor long-term functional outcome and the recurrence rate of 44 % warrant a cautious patient selection.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Perineal stapled prolapse (PSP) resection is a novel operation for treating external rectal prolapse. However, no long-term results have been reported in the literature. This study analyses the long-term recurrence rate, functional outcome, and morbidity associated with PSP resection. METHODS: Nine consecutive patients undergoing PSP resection between 2007 and 2011 were prospectively followed. Surgery was performed by the same surgeons in a standardised technique. Recurrence rate, functional outcome, and complication grade were prospectively assessed. RESULTS: All 9 patients undergoing PSP resection were investigated. The median age was 72 years (range 25-88 years). No intraoperative complications occurred. Faecal incontinence, preoperatively present in 2 patients, worsened postoperatively in one patient (Vaizey 18-22). One patient developed new-onset faecal incontinence (Vaizey 18). The median obstructive defecation syndrome score decreased postoperatively significantly from 11 (median; range 8-13) to 5 (median; range 4-8) (p < 0.005). At a median follow-up of 40 months (range 14-58 months), the prolapse recurrence rate was 44 % (4/9 patients). CONCLUSIONS: The PSP resection is a fast and safe procedure associated with low morbidity. However, the poor long-term functional outcome and the recurrence rate of 44 % warrant a cautious patient selection.

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2013
Deposited On:17 Oct 2013 08:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:03
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1123-6337
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10151-013-1009-8
PubMed ID:23613218

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations