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Trade-offs between assessor team size and assessor expertise in affecting rating accuracy in assessment centers


Wirz, Andreja; Melchers, Klaus G; Lievens, Filip; De Corte, Wilfried; Kleinmann, Martin (2013). Trade-offs between assessor team size and assessor expertise in affecting rating accuracy in assessment centers. Revista de Psicologia del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones, 29(1):13-20.

Abstract

We investigated the effects of assessor team size on the accuracy of ratings in a presentation exercise as it is commonly used in assessment centers and compared it to the effects of two factors related to assessor expertise (assessor training and assessor background). On the basis of actual ratings from a simulated selection setting (N = 383), we sampled assessor teams of different sizes and with different expertise and determined the accuracy of their ratings in the presentation exercise. Of the three factors, assessor training had the strongest effect on rating accuracy. Furthermore, in most conditions, using larger assessor teams also led to more accurate ratings. In addition, the use of larger assessor teams compensated for having not attended an assessor training only when the assessors had a psychological background. Concerning assessor background, we did not find a significant main effect. Practical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

We investigated the effects of assessor team size on the accuracy of ratings in a presentation exercise as it is commonly used in assessment centers and compared it to the effects of two factors related to assessor expertise (assessor training and assessor background). On the basis of actual ratings from a simulated selection setting (N = 383), we sampled assessor teams of different sizes and with different expertise and determined the accuracy of their ratings in the presentation exercise. Of the three factors, assessor training had the strongest effect on rating accuracy. Furthermore, in most conditions, using larger assessor teams also led to more accurate ratings. In addition, the use of larger assessor teams compensated for having not attended an assessor training only when the assessors had a psychological background. Concerning assessor background, we did not find a significant main effect. Practical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:17 Oct 2013 06:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:03
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1576-5962
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5093/tr2013a3

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