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Effects of self-monitored jogging on physical fitness, blood pressure and serum lipids: a controlled study in sedentary middle-aged men


Suter, E; Marti, B; Tschopp, A; Wanner, H U; Wenk, C; Gutzwiller, Felix (1990). Effects of self-monitored jogging on physical fitness, blood pressure and serum lipids: a controlled study in sedentary middle-aged men. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 11(6):425-432.

Abstract

To study the effects of long-term, home-based exercise on physical fitness and cardiovascular risk factors of middle-aged nonsmoking males, a controlled study was conducted in 61 sedentary Swiss men. Thirty-nine men were randomly allocated to jog 2 h/week for 4 months on an individually prescribed and heart-rate-controlled basis, whereas 22 men served as controls. Despite varying adherence to the exercise regimen, the 4-month net change (effect in exercise group minus effect in control group) in estimated endurance capacity was significant and positive. Net changes in arterial blood pressure, measured with a random-zero device, were nonsignificant, but after exclusion of low-normotensive men (n = 19) from analysis, a significant net effect of exercise on diastolic blood pressure was seen (-4.3 mmHg; p = .048). The following net changes in serum lipid levels occurred: HDL cholesterol + 0.12 mmol/l (p = .028), total triglycerides -0.21 mmol/l (ns), HDL-C/total cholesterol ratio +0.02 (p = .047). Exploratory analyses revealed that an increase in estimated endurance capacity was associated with a rise in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.49 and 0.43, respectively; p less than 0.01 both). Changes in the waist-hip ratio were directly related to the change in diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.27; p less than 0.05). Multivariable analysis indicated that much of the beneficial effect of exercise on diastolic blood pressure was apparently mediated through a decrease in body fat. This study confirms that individually prescribed jogging can reduce cardiovascular risk factors in self-selected nonsmoking males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

To study the effects of long-term, home-based exercise on physical fitness and cardiovascular risk factors of middle-aged nonsmoking males, a controlled study was conducted in 61 sedentary Swiss men. Thirty-nine men were randomly allocated to jog 2 h/week for 4 months on an individually prescribed and heart-rate-controlled basis, whereas 22 men served as controls. Despite varying adherence to the exercise regimen, the 4-month net change (effect in exercise group minus effect in control group) in estimated endurance capacity was significant and positive. Net changes in arterial blood pressure, measured with a random-zero device, were nonsignificant, but after exclusion of low-normotensive men (n = 19) from analysis, a significant net effect of exercise on diastolic blood pressure was seen (-4.3 mmHg; p = .048). The following net changes in serum lipid levels occurred: HDL cholesterol + 0.12 mmol/l (p = .028), total triglycerides -0.21 mmol/l (ns), HDL-C/total cholesterol ratio +0.02 (p = .047). Exploratory analyses revealed that an increase in estimated endurance capacity was associated with a rise in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.49 and 0.43, respectively; p less than 0.01 both). Changes in the waist-hip ratio were directly related to the change in diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.27; p less than 0.05). Multivariable analysis indicated that much of the beneficial effect of exercise on diastolic blood pressure was apparently mediated through a decrease in body fat. This study confirms that individually prescribed jogging can reduce cardiovascular risk factors in self-selected nonsmoking males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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27 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1990
Deposited On:18 Oct 2013 06:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:03
Publisher:Georg Thieme Verlag
ISSN:0172-4622
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-1024832
PubMed ID:2286480

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