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Abnormal high-density lipoprotein induces endothelial dysfunction via activation of Toll-like receptor-2


Abstract

Endothelial injury and dysfunction (ED) represent a link between cardiovascular risk factors promoting hypertension and atherosclerosis, the leading cause of death in Western populations. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is considered antiatherogenic and known to prevent ED. Using HDL from children and adults with chronic kidney dysfunction (HDL(CKD)), a population with high cardiovascular risk, we have demonstrated that HDL(CKD) in contrast to HDL(Healthy) promoted endothelial superoxide production, substantially reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and subsequently increased arterial blood pressure (ABP). We have identified symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) in HDL(CKD) that causes transformation from physiological HDL into an abnormal lipoprotein inducing ED. Furthermore, we report that HDL(CKD) reduced endothelial NO availability via toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2), leading to impaired endothelial repair, increased proinflammatory activation, and ABP. These data demonstrate how SDMA can modify the HDL particle to mimic a damage-associated molecular pattern that activates TLR-2 via a TLR-1- or TLR-6-coreceptor-independent pathway, linking abnormal HDL to innate immunity, ED, and hypertension.

Endothelial injury and dysfunction (ED) represent a link between cardiovascular risk factors promoting hypertension and atherosclerosis, the leading cause of death in Western populations. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is considered antiatherogenic and known to prevent ED. Using HDL from children and adults with chronic kidney dysfunction (HDL(CKD)), a population with high cardiovascular risk, we have demonstrated that HDL(CKD) in contrast to HDL(Healthy) promoted endothelial superoxide production, substantially reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and subsequently increased arterial blood pressure (ABP). We have identified symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) in HDL(CKD) that causes transformation from physiological HDL into an abnormal lipoprotein inducing ED. Furthermore, we report that HDL(CKD) reduced endothelial NO availability via toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2), leading to impaired endothelial repair, increased proinflammatory activation, and ABP. These data demonstrate how SDMA can modify the HDL particle to mimic a damage-associated molecular pattern that activates TLR-2 via a TLR-1- or TLR-6-coreceptor-independent pathway, linking abnormal HDL to innate immunity, ED, and hypertension.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:23 Oct 2013 06:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:03
Publisher:Cell Press (Elsevier)
ISSN:1074-7613
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2013.02.009
PubMed ID:23477738

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