UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Glycosylations in the globular head of the hemagglutinin protein modulate the virulence and antigenic properties of the H1N1 influenza viruses


Medina, R A; Stertz, S; Manicassamy, C; Zimmermann, P; Sun, X; Albrecht, R A; Uusi-Kerttula, H; Zagordi, O; Belshe, R B; Frey, S E; Tumpey, T M; García-Sastre, A (2013). Glycosylations in the globular head of the hemagglutinin protein modulate the virulence and antigenic properties of the H1N1 influenza viruses. Science Translational Medicine, 5(187):187ra70.

Abstract

With the global spread of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus, there are increasing worries about evolution through antigenic drift. One way previous seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 influenza strains have evolved over time is by acquiring additional glycosylations in the globular head of their hemagglutinin (HA) proteins; these glycosylations have been believed to shield antigenically relevant regions from antibody immune responses. We added additional HA glycosylation sites to influenza A/Netherlands/602/2009 recombinant (rpH1N1) viruses, reflecting their temporal appearance in previous seasonal H1N1 viruses. Additional glycosylations resulted in substantially attenuated infection in mice and ferrets, whereas deleting HA glycosylation sites from a pre-pandemic virus resulted in increased pathogenicity in mice. We then more directly investigated the interactions of HA glycosylations and antibody responses through mutational analysis. We found that the polyclonal antibody response elicited by wild-type rpH1N1 HA was likely directed against an immunodominant region, which could be shielded by glycosylation at position 144. However, rpH1N1 HA glycosylated at position 144 elicited a broader polyclonal response able to cross-neutralize all wild-type and glycosylation mutant pH1N1 viruses. Moreover, mice infected with a recent seasonal virus in which glycosylation sites were removed elicited antibodies that protected against challenge with the antigenically distant pH1N1 virus. Thus, acquisition of glycosylation sites in the HA of H1N1 human influenza viruses affected not only their pathogenicity and ability to escape from polyclonal antibodies elicited by previous influenza virus strains but also their ability to induce cross-reactive antibodies against drifted antigenic variants.

With the global spread of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus, there are increasing worries about evolution through antigenic drift. One way previous seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 influenza strains have evolved over time is by acquiring additional glycosylations in the globular head of their hemagglutinin (HA) proteins; these glycosylations have been believed to shield antigenically relevant regions from antibody immune responses. We added additional HA glycosylation sites to influenza A/Netherlands/602/2009 recombinant (rpH1N1) viruses, reflecting their temporal appearance in previous seasonal H1N1 viruses. Additional glycosylations resulted in substantially attenuated infection in mice and ferrets, whereas deleting HA glycosylation sites from a pre-pandemic virus resulted in increased pathogenicity in mice. We then more directly investigated the interactions of HA glycosylations and antibody responses through mutational analysis. We found that the polyclonal antibody response elicited by wild-type rpH1N1 HA was likely directed against an immunodominant region, which could be shielded by glycosylation at position 144. However, rpH1N1 HA glycosylated at position 144 elicited a broader polyclonal response able to cross-neutralize all wild-type and glycosylation mutant pH1N1 viruses. Moreover, mice infected with a recent seasonal virus in which glycosylation sites were removed elicited antibodies that protected against challenge with the antigenically distant pH1N1 virus. Thus, acquisition of glycosylation sites in the HA of H1N1 human influenza viruses affected not only their pathogenicity and ability to escape from polyclonal antibodies elicited by previous influenza virus strains but also their ability to induce cross-reactive antibodies against drifted antigenic variants.

Citations

13 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

47 downloads since deposited on 28 Oct 2013
11 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:29 May 2013
Deposited On:28 Oct 2013 07:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:04
Publisher:American Association for the Advancement of Science
ISSN:1946-6234
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.3005996
Official URL:http://stm.sciencemag.org/
PubMed ID:23720581
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-82292

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 2MB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 6MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations