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Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma arising in the ethmoid sinus of an 8-year-old girl with severe epistaxis


Birchler, M T; Schmid, S; Holzmann, D; Stallmach, T; Gysin, C (2006). Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma arising in the ethmoid sinus of an 8-year-old girl with severe epistaxis. Head and Neck, 28(8):761-764.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Epistaxis is very common during childhood. It occurs primarily in boys and is usually self-limiting. Trauma and nose picking are among the most common causes. In general, epistaxis can be easily treated with anterior nasal packing or electrocoagulation. METHODS: We report a case of an 8-year-old girl with severe unilateral epistaxis. RESULTS: The bleeding originated from a kaposiform hemangioendothelioma arising in the left nasal cavity and ethmoid sinus. The feeding vessels originating from the maxillary artery were first embolized. The tumor was then surgically removed through a combined external ethmoidectomy and endonasal approach. The postoperative course was uneventful. MRI at 6 months after surgery showed no tumor recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: We report a previously undescribed cause of epistaxis in children, namely, a kaposiform hemangioendothelioma. To our knowledge, this is the first such case in the English-language literature. The differential diagnosis of severe unilateral nasal bleeding among the pediatric population should include the possibility of a kaposiform hemangioendothelioma.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Epistaxis is very common during childhood. It occurs primarily in boys and is usually self-limiting. Trauma and nose picking are among the most common causes. In general, epistaxis can be easily treated with anterior nasal packing or electrocoagulation. METHODS: We report a case of an 8-year-old girl with severe unilateral epistaxis. RESULTS: The bleeding originated from a kaposiform hemangioendothelioma arising in the left nasal cavity and ethmoid sinus. The feeding vessels originating from the maxillary artery were first embolized. The tumor was then surgically removed through a combined external ethmoidectomy and endonasal approach. The postoperative course was uneventful. MRI at 6 months after surgery showed no tumor recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: We report a previously undescribed cause of epistaxis in children, namely, a kaposiform hemangioendothelioma. To our knowledge, this is the first such case in the English-language literature. The differential diagnosis of severe unilateral nasal bleeding among the pediatric population should include the possibility of a kaposiform hemangioendothelioma.

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:30 Mar 2009 16:02
Last Modified:13 May 2016 10:29
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1043-3074
Additional Information:Wiley full text available online
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.20414
Official URL:http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/112635793/PDFSTART
PubMed ID:16721737

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