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Evaluation of a cement incus replacement prosthesis in a temporal bone model


Asai, M; Heiland, K E; Huber, A M; Goode, R L (1999). Evaluation of a cement incus replacement prosthesis in a temporal bone model. Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 119(5):573-576.

Abstract

In reconstruction of the ossicular chain for a damaged incus, it is important that the incus replacement prosthesis (IRP) length is ideal in order to provide optimal tension between the tympanic membrane or malleus and stapes head to achieve the best post-operative hearing result. Even though the length of commercially available IRPs can be adjusted, it still may be difficult to achieve clinically. We describe experiments in a human temporal bone model using dental cement as an IRP after removal of the incus. This cement IRP (CIRP) hardens in situ and becomes the length of the gap to be spanned so that tension should be ideal. Two different CIRPs were studied; one was a conventional rod-type CIRP connecting either the umbo or mid-malleus handle to the stapes head. The second was a Y-shaped CIRP (Y-CIRP), connecting two sites on the malleus to the stapes head. The wide Y-CIRP connected the malleus head and umbo to the stapes head, while the narrow Y-CIRP connected the malleus neck and mid-handle to the stapes head. The acoustic performance of these experimental CIRPs was studied using a laser Doppler vibrometer system in 12 fresh human temporal bones. The CIRP demonstrated better acoustic performance than conventional IRPs studied previously in the same model. While all the CIRPs showed similar function below 2.0 kHz, the narrow Y-CIRP appeared best above 3.0 kHz. A prosthesis of this type may have an acoustic advantage over conventional IRPs.

Abstract

In reconstruction of the ossicular chain for a damaged incus, it is important that the incus replacement prosthesis (IRP) length is ideal in order to provide optimal tension between the tympanic membrane or malleus and stapes head to achieve the best post-operative hearing result. Even though the length of commercially available IRPs can be adjusted, it still may be difficult to achieve clinically. We describe experiments in a human temporal bone model using dental cement as an IRP after removal of the incus. This cement IRP (CIRP) hardens in situ and becomes the length of the gap to be spanned so that tension should be ideal. Two different CIRPs were studied; one was a conventional rod-type CIRP connecting either the umbo or mid-malleus handle to the stapes head. The second was a Y-shaped CIRP (Y-CIRP), connecting two sites on the malleus to the stapes head. The wide Y-CIRP connected the malleus head and umbo to the stapes head, while the narrow Y-CIRP connected the malleus neck and mid-handle to the stapes head. The acoustic performance of these experimental CIRPs was studied using a laser Doppler vibrometer system in 12 fresh human temporal bones. The CIRP demonstrated better acoustic performance than conventional IRPs studied previously in the same model. While all the CIRPs showed similar function below 2.0 kHz, the narrow Y-CIRP appeared best above 3.0 kHz. A prosthesis of this type may have an acoustic advantage over conventional IRPs.

Citations

13 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1999
Deposited On:30 Mar 2009 10:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:43
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0001-6489
PubMed ID:10478598

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