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A small-scale robotic manipulandum for motor training in stroke rats


Vigaru, Bogdan; Lambercy, Olivier; Graber, Lina; Fluit, René; Wespe, Pascal; Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Luft, Andreas R; Gassert, Roger (2011). A small-scale robotic manipulandum for motor training in stroke rats. IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems. Proceedings, 2011:5975349.

Abstract

The investigation and characterization of sensori-motor learning and execution represents a key objective for the design of optimal rehabilitation therapies following stroke. By supplying new tools to investigate sensorimotor learning and objectively assess recovery, robot assisted techniques have opened new lines of research in neurorehabilitation aiming to complement current clinical strategies. Human studies, however, are limited by the complex logistics, heterogeneous patient populations and large dropout rates. Rat models may provide a substitute to explore the mechanisms underlying these processes in humans with larger and more homogeneous populations. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a three-degrees-of-freedom robotic manipulandum to train and assess precision forelimb movement in rats before and after stroke. The mechanical design is presented based on the requirements of interaction with rat kinematics and kinetics. The characterization of the robot exhibits a compact, low friction device, with a sufficient bandwidth suitable for motor training studies with rodents. The manipulandum was integrated with an existing training environment for rodent experiments and a first study is currently underway.

Abstract

The investigation and characterization of sensori-motor learning and execution represents a key objective for the design of optimal rehabilitation therapies following stroke. By supplying new tools to investigate sensorimotor learning and objectively assess recovery, robot assisted techniques have opened new lines of research in neurorehabilitation aiming to complement current clinical strategies. Human studies, however, are limited by the complex logistics, heterogeneous patient populations and large dropout rates. Rat models may provide a substitute to explore the mechanisms underlying these processes in humans with larger and more homogeneous populations. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a three-degrees-of-freedom robotic manipulandum to train and assess precision forelimb movement in rats before and after stroke. The mechanical design is presented based on the requirements of interaction with rat kinematics and kinetics. The characterization of the robot exhibits a compact, low friction device, with a sufficient bandwidth suitable for motor training studies with rodents. The manipulandum was integrated with an existing training environment for rodent experiments and a first study is currently underway.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:14 Nov 2013 14:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:08
Publisher:Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
ISSN:2153-0858
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2011.5975349
PubMed ID:22275553

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