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cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and the dynamics of epithelial cell surface domains: moving membranes to keep in shape


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Wojtal, K A; Hoekstra, D; van IJzendoorn, S C D (2008). cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and the dynamics of epithelial cell surface domains: moving membranes to keep in shape. BioEssays, 30(2):146-155.

Abstract

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) are evolutionary conserved molecules with a well-established position in the complex network of signal transduction pathways. cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling pathways are implicated in many biological processes that cooperate in organ development including the motility, survival, proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells. Cell surface polarity, here defined as the anisotropic organisation of cellular membranes, is a critical parameter for most of these processes. Changes in the activity of cAMP/PKA elicit a variety of effects on intracellular membrane dynamics, including membrane sorting and trafficking. One of the most intriguing aspects of cAMP/PKA signaling is its evolutionary conserved abundance on the one hand and its precise spatial-temporal actions on the other. Here, we review recent developments with regard to the role of cAMP/PKA in the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking in relation to the dynamics of epithelial surface domains.

Abstract

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) are evolutionary conserved molecules with a well-established position in the complex network of signal transduction pathways. cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling pathways are implicated in many biological processes that cooperate in organ development including the motility, survival, proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells. Cell surface polarity, here defined as the anisotropic organisation of cellular membranes, is a critical parameter for most of these processes. Changes in the activity of cAMP/PKA elicit a variety of effects on intracellular membrane dynamics, including membrane sorting and trafficking. One of the most intriguing aspects of cAMP/PKA signaling is its evolutionary conserved abundance on the one hand and its precise spatial-temporal actions on the other. Here, we review recent developments with regard to the role of cAMP/PKA in the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking in relation to the dynamics of epithelial surface domains.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2008
Deposited On:17 Dec 2008 13:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:44
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0265-9247
Additional Information:This is a preprint of an article accepted for publication in BioEssays Copyright © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/bies.20705
PubMed ID:18200529

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