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Psychiatric disorders and major spine surgery: epidemiology and perioperative outcomes


Menendez, Mariano E; Neuhaus, Valentin; Bot, Arjan G J; Ring, David; Cha, Thomas D (2014). Psychiatric disorders and major spine surgery: epidemiology and perioperative outcomes. Spine, 39(2):E111-22.

Abstract

Study Design. Analysis of the National Hospital Discharge Survey database from 1990 to 2007.Objective. To evaluate the influence of preoperative depression, anxiety, schizophrenia or dementia on in hospital (1) adverse events, (2) mortality and (3) non-routine discharge in patients undergoing major spine surgery.Summary of Background Data. Psychiatric comorbidity is a known risk factor for impaired health-related quality of life and poor long-term outcomes following spine surgery, yet little is known about its impact in the perioperative spine surgery setting.Methods. Using the National Hospital Discharge Survey database, all patients undergoing either spinal fusion or laminectomy between 1990 and 2007 were identified and separated into groups with and without psychiatric disorders. Multivariable regression analysis was performed for each of the outcome variables.Results. Between 1990 and 2007, a total estimated number of 5,382,343 spinal fusions and laminectomies were performed. The prevalence of diagnosed depression, anxiety and schizophrenia among the study population increased significantly over time. Depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and dementia were associated with higher rates of non-routine discharge. Depression, schizophrenia and dementia were associated with higher rates of adverse events. Dementia was the only psychiatric disorder associated with a higher risk of in hospital mortality.Conclusion. Patients with preoperative psychiatric disorders undergoing major spine surgery are at increased risk for perioperative adverse events and post hospitalization care, but its effect in perioperative mortality is more limited. Pre-surgical psychological screening of spine surgery candidates might ultimately lead to the enhancement of perioperative outcomes in this growing segment of the US population.

Abstract

Study Design. Analysis of the National Hospital Discharge Survey database from 1990 to 2007.Objective. To evaluate the influence of preoperative depression, anxiety, schizophrenia or dementia on in hospital (1) adverse events, (2) mortality and (3) non-routine discharge in patients undergoing major spine surgery.Summary of Background Data. Psychiatric comorbidity is a known risk factor for impaired health-related quality of life and poor long-term outcomes following spine surgery, yet little is known about its impact in the perioperative spine surgery setting.Methods. Using the National Hospital Discharge Survey database, all patients undergoing either spinal fusion or laminectomy between 1990 and 2007 were identified and separated into groups with and without psychiatric disorders. Multivariable regression analysis was performed for each of the outcome variables.Results. Between 1990 and 2007, a total estimated number of 5,382,343 spinal fusions and laminectomies were performed. The prevalence of diagnosed depression, anxiety and schizophrenia among the study population increased significantly over time. Depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and dementia were associated with higher rates of non-routine discharge. Depression, schizophrenia and dementia were associated with higher rates of adverse events. Dementia was the only psychiatric disorder associated with a higher risk of in hospital mortality.Conclusion. Patients with preoperative psychiatric disorders undergoing major spine surgery are at increased risk for perioperative adverse events and post hospitalization care, but its effect in perioperative mortality is more limited. Pre-surgical psychological screening of spine surgery candidates might ultimately lead to the enhancement of perioperative outcomes in this growing segment of the US population.

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19 citations in Web of Science®
20 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2014
Deposited On:29 Nov 2013 14:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:11
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0362-2436
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000000064
PubMed ID:24108288

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