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Proximal anterior cruciate ligament tears: the healing response technique versus conservative treatment


Wasmaier, Johann; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Grehn, Holger; Bieg, Christian; Eid, Karim (2013). Proximal anterior cruciate ligament tears: the healing response technique versus conservative treatment. Journal of Knee Surgery, 26(4):263-271.

Abstract

The healing response technique (HRT) is a nonreconstructive method to promote healing in proximal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. The study reviews clinical and radiological long-term results. Thirty patients (average age 31 years) were treated according to the protocol described by Steadman et al. For comparison, an age- and gender-matched control group of conservatively treated patients (CST; n = 127) was selected. At follow-up (mean: 4 years), all patients were evaluated using Kneelax-3-arthrometer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and by clinical examination. Two HRT patients were lost to follow-up and 10 (36%) patients needed definitive ACL reconstruction. The rate of secondary ACL reconstruction in the initial CST group was 56% (71 of 127). Nineteen of the conservatively treated patients were selected according to above-mentioned criteria. The average Lysholm score in the HRT group was 91 (CST group = 90), and the Orthopaedische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Knie score was 93 (CST group = 92). Tegner score decreased from 6.8 before injury to 5.7 at the time of follow-up (CST group: 6.0 to 5.1). Kneelax-3-arthrometer showed a significant higher anterior knee laxity compared with the noninjured side in both groups. MRI showed improvement of the ACL in both groups. HRT in adult patients is associated with a high revision rate of 36% secondary ACL reconstruction, comparable with primary conservative treatment (p = 0.056). For the remaining patients (64%), HRT did not result in better outcomes than conservative treatment.

The healing response technique (HRT) is a nonreconstructive method to promote healing in proximal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. The study reviews clinical and radiological long-term results. Thirty patients (average age 31 years) were treated according to the protocol described by Steadman et al. For comparison, an age- and gender-matched control group of conservatively treated patients (CST; n = 127) was selected. At follow-up (mean: 4 years), all patients were evaluated using Kneelax-3-arthrometer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and by clinical examination. Two HRT patients were lost to follow-up and 10 (36%) patients needed definitive ACL reconstruction. The rate of secondary ACL reconstruction in the initial CST group was 56% (71 of 127). Nineteen of the conservatively treated patients were selected according to above-mentioned criteria. The average Lysholm score in the HRT group was 91 (CST group = 90), and the Orthopaedische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Knie score was 93 (CST group = 92). Tegner score decreased from 6.8 before injury to 5.7 at the time of follow-up (CST group: 6.0 to 5.1). Kneelax-3-arthrometer showed a significant higher anterior knee laxity compared with the noninjured side in both groups. MRI showed improvement of the ACL in both groups. HRT in adult patients is associated with a high revision rate of 36% secondary ACL reconstruction, comparable with primary conservative treatment (p = 0.056). For the remaining patients (64%), HRT did not result in better outcomes than conservative treatment.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2013
Deposited On:06 Dec 2013 13:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:13
Publisher:Georg Thieme Verlag
ISSN:1538-8506
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0032-1329720
PubMed ID:23258320

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