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The Ḥaram of Jerusalem 324-1099: temple, Friday mosque, area of spiritual power


Kaplony, Andreas (2002). The Ḥaram of Jerusalem 324-1099: temple, Friday mosque, area of spiritual power. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner.

Abstract

From the Muslims’ to the Crusaders’ conquest Jerusalem is among the world’s best known cities. Its most outstanding and constant feature is its shared holiness by three major confessions (Muslim, Jewish and Christian).
Covering the Marwanid, the Abbasid, and the Faimid phase, this study describes not only the emergence of conceptions with which the three major confessions share this city, but also their interactions as well as the political circumstances and religious axioms which give each conception its specific shape.
Looking for these conceptions of the holy area of the city the Haram has been chosen. This area of the former temple was highly significant to all three confessions. The analysis is based on a careful description of the Haram (focusing on topics like names and traditions, architecture, rituals and customs, visions and dreams), and on the establishment of as many parallels as possible.

From the Muslims’ to the Crusaders’ conquest Jerusalem is among the world’s best known cities. Its most outstanding and constant feature is its shared holiness by three major confessions (Muslim, Jewish and Christian).
Covering the Marwanid, the Abbasid, and the Faimid phase, this study describes not only the emergence of conceptions with which the three major confessions share this city, but also their interactions as well as the political circumstances and religious axioms which give each conception its specific shape.
Looking for these conceptions of the holy area of the city the Haram has been chosen. This area of the former temple was highly significant to all three confessions. The analysis is based on a careful description of the Haram (focusing on topics like names and traditions, architecture, rituals and customs, visions and dreams), and on the establishment of as many parallels as possible.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Monograph
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:180 Ancient, medieval & eastern philosophy
290 Other religions
Language:English
Date:2002
Deposited On:27 Mar 2009 08:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:44
Publisher:Franz Steiner
Series Name:Freiburger Islamstudien
Volume:22
Number of Pages:789
ISBN:3-515-07901-7
Additional Information:Originally habilitation (doctorate) for the faculty of Arts, University Zurich
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=004327676

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