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Transdermal application of methimazole in hyperthyroid cats: a long-term follow-up study


Boretti, F S; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N S; Schäfer, S; Gerber, B; Baumgartner, C; Riond, B; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Reusch, C E (2014). Transdermal application of methimazole in hyperthyroid cats: a long-term follow-up study. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 16(6):453-459.

Abstract

Transdermal methimazole is suggested as an alternative to oral therapy for hyperthyroid cats that are difficult to pill. However, no information on long-term management with this treatment is available. Our objective was therefore to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term transdermal methimazole-treated hyperthyroid cats. Sixty cats with newly diagnosed hyperthyroidism and available long-term follow-up information were included. Methimazole was formulated in a pluronic lecithin organogel-based vehicle and was applied to the pinna of the inner ear. Cats were re-evaluated at regular intervals. Median (range) follow-up was 22.6 months (3.6-88.4 months). Clinical improvement was observed in all cats and side effects were rare (mild transient gastrointestinal signs: n = 3; erythema of the pinna: n = 2, necessitating a switch to oral medication). Despite a significant decrease, with median T4 concentrations within the reference interval during the follow-up period, several cats repeatedly had T4 concentrations in the thyrotoxic and hypothyroid range. Maximal and minimal daily doses during the follow-up period were 15.0 and 1.0 mg, respectively; they were significantly higher than the starting dose after 24-36 months of therapy. Although the majority of owners were highly satisfied with the treatment, several admitted not treating their cat regularly. Transdermal methimazole is a safe option for the long-term management of feline hyperthyroidism. However, it seems difficult to keep the T4 concentrations constantly within the reference interval: higher doses can be expected after prolonged treatment and, despite the convenience of transdermal application, owner compliance should be assessed regularly.

Transdermal methimazole is suggested as an alternative to oral therapy for hyperthyroid cats that are difficult to pill. However, no information on long-term management with this treatment is available. Our objective was therefore to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term transdermal methimazole-treated hyperthyroid cats. Sixty cats with newly diagnosed hyperthyroidism and available long-term follow-up information were included. Methimazole was formulated in a pluronic lecithin organogel-based vehicle and was applied to the pinna of the inner ear. Cats were re-evaluated at regular intervals. Median (range) follow-up was 22.6 months (3.6-88.4 months). Clinical improvement was observed in all cats and side effects were rare (mild transient gastrointestinal signs: n = 3; erythema of the pinna: n = 2, necessitating a switch to oral medication). Despite a significant decrease, with median T4 concentrations within the reference interval during the follow-up period, several cats repeatedly had T4 concentrations in the thyrotoxic and hypothyroid range. Maximal and minimal daily doses during the follow-up period were 15.0 and 1.0 mg, respectively; they were significantly higher than the starting dose after 24-36 months of therapy. Although the majority of owners were highly satisfied with the treatment, several admitted not treating their cat regularly. Transdermal methimazole is a safe option for the long-term management of feline hyperthyroidism. However, it seems difficult to keep the T4 concentrations constantly within the reference interval: higher doses can be expected after prolonged treatment and, despite the convenience of transdermal application, owner compliance should be assessed regularly.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:19 Dec 2013 09:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1098-612X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1098612X13509808
PubMed ID:24174499
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-86218

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