UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Refractory chronic pelvic pain syndrome in men: can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation help?


Schneider, Marc P; Tellenbach, Marc; Mordasini, Livio; Thalmann, George N; Kessler, Thomas M (2013). Refractory chronic pelvic pain syndrome in men: can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation help? BJU International, 112(2):E159-E163.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for treating men with refractory chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A consecutive series of 60 men treated with TENS for refractory CPPS was evaluated prospectively at an academic tertiary referral centre. The effects of treatment were evaluated by a pain diary and by the quality of life item of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index at baseline, after 12 weeks of TENS treatment, and at last known follow-up. Adverse events related to TENS were also assessed. RESULTS: The mean (95% confidence interval, CI; range) age of the 60 men was 46.9 (43.5-50.3; 21-82) years. TENS was successful after 12 weeks of treatment in 29 (48%) patients and a positive effect was sustained during a mean (95%, CI; range) follow-up of 43.6 (33.2-56; 6-88) months in 21 patients. After 12 weeks of TENS treatment, mean (95% CI) pain visual analogue scale decreased significantly (P < 0.001) from 6.6 (6.3-6.9) to 3.9 (3.2-4.6). Patients' quality of life changed significantly after TENS treatment (P < 0.001). Before TENS, all 60 patients felt mostly dissatisfied (n = 17; 28%), unhappy (n = 28; 47%) or terrible (n = 15; 25%). After 12 weeks of TENS treatment, 29 (48%) patients felt mostly satisfied (n = 5), pleased (n = 18) or delighted (n = 6). No adverse events related to TENS were noted. CONCLUSION: TENS may be an effective and safe treatment for refractory CPPS in men, warranting randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for treating men with refractory chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A consecutive series of 60 men treated with TENS for refractory CPPS was evaluated prospectively at an academic tertiary referral centre. The effects of treatment were evaluated by a pain diary and by the quality of life item of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index at baseline, after 12 weeks of TENS treatment, and at last known follow-up. Adverse events related to TENS were also assessed. RESULTS: The mean (95% confidence interval, CI; range) age of the 60 men was 46.9 (43.5-50.3; 21-82) years. TENS was successful after 12 weeks of treatment in 29 (48%) patients and a positive effect was sustained during a mean (95%, CI; range) follow-up of 43.6 (33.2-56; 6-88) months in 21 patients. After 12 weeks of TENS treatment, mean (95% CI) pain visual analogue scale decreased significantly (P < 0.001) from 6.6 (6.3-6.9) to 3.9 (3.2-4.6). Patients' quality of life changed significantly after TENS treatment (P < 0.001). Before TENS, all 60 patients felt mostly dissatisfied (n = 17; 28%), unhappy (n = 28; 47%) or terrible (n = 15; 25%). After 12 weeks of TENS treatment, 29 (48%) patients felt mostly satisfied (n = 5), pleased (n = 18) or delighted (n = 6). No adverse events related to TENS were noted. CONCLUSION: TENS may be an effective and safe treatment for refractory CPPS in men, warranting randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2013
Deposited On:13 Dec 2013 11:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:15
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1464-4096
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/bju.12005
PubMed ID:23433012

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations